infarction

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infarction

a localized area of tissue that is dying or dead, having been deprived of its blood supply because of an obstruction
Not to be confused with:
infraction – breach; violation; infringement: infraction of the rules; in medicine, an incomplete fracture of a bone

in·farc·tion

 (ĭn-färk′shən)
n.
1. The formation or development of an infarct.
2. An infarct.

infarction

(ɪnˈfɑːkʃən)
n
1. (Pathology) the formation or development of an infarct
2. (Pathology) another word for infarct

in•farc•tion

(ɪnˈfɑrk ʃən)

n.
1. the formation of an infarct.
2. an infarct.
[1680–90]

infarction

a condition in which a localized area of muscular tissue is dying or dead owing to insufficient supply of blood, as occurs in a heart attack.
See also: Heart
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infarction - localized necrosis resulting from obstruction of the blood supply
MI, myocardial infarct, myocardial infarction - destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
Translations

infarction

n (Med)
(= dead tissue)Infarkt m
(= forming of dead tissue)Infarktbildung f

infarction

n infarto, acción f y efecto de un infarto; acute myocardial — infarto agudo de miocardio
References in periodicals archive ?
27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The combination of smaller and larger infarctions detected in stroke-free individuals in middle age is associated with substantial cognitive decline later in life, according to a study published online Aug.
Cerebral infarctions as manifestation of ovarian clear cell carcinoma: report of two cases and review of the literature.
Over the last several years, there has been an increase in the incidence of non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) heart attacks (without ST segment elevation) and a comparable decrease in the number of myocardial infarctions with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).
Intubation due to neurologic deterioration in MCA infarctions was found as 90% in the study by Berrouschot et al.
While most acute myocardial infarctions are characterised by significant and often severe symptoms, a substantial minority are accompanied by minimal or no discomfort.
Placing electrodes on the back of the thorax in routine practice increases the number of registered posterior myocardial infarctions so the incidence of all myocardial infarctions is considered to be 3.3% [15].
Perhaps more important clinically, 19% (31/180) of the acute myocardial infarctions not identified by the coders in the Diaz-Garzon et al.
Bilateral cerebral peduncular infarctions (BCPI) are an extremely rare neurological disorder, occurring in only 0.26% of patients with acute ischemic stroke [1].
In the GISSI-3 database, EF [?]40 percent, was associated with an increase in the incidence of LV thrombus with both anterior MI (17.8 versus 9.6 percent with a higher LVEF9) and infarctions at other sites (5.4 versus 1.8 percent).
However, whether antiplatelet therapy could prevent the development of ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction remained unknown.
Background: Wallerian degeneration (WD) of bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles (MCPs) can occur following pontine infarction, but its characteristics have not yet been clarified because of the low incidence.