infarct

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in·farct

 (ĭn′färkt′, ĭn-färkt′)
n.
An area of tissue that undergoes necrosis as a result of obstruction of local blood supply, as by a thrombus or embolus.

[From Latin īnfarctus, past participle of īnfarcīre, to cram : in-, in; see in-2 + farcīre, to stuff.]

in·farct′ed adj.

infarct

(ɪnˈfɑːkt)
n
(Pathology) a localized area of dead tissue (necrosis) resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to that part, esp by an embolus. Also called: infarction
[C19: via New Latin from Latin infarctus stuffed into, from farcīre to stuff]
inˈfarcted adj

in•farct

(ˈɪnˌfɑrkt, ɪnˈfɑrkt)

n.
an area of tissue, as in the heart or kidney, that is dying or dead, having been deprived of its blood supply.
[1870–75; < New Latin infarctus, n. use of past participle of Latin infarcīre (variant of infercīre) to stuff (compare farce)]
in•farct′ed, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infarct - localized necrosis resulting from obstruction of the blood supply
MI, myocardial infarct, myocardial infarction - destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
Translations

infarct

n (Med) → Infarkt m

in·farct

n. infarto, necrosis de un área de tejido por falta de irrigación sanguínea (isquemia);
bland ______ blando;
cardiac ______ cardíaco;
cerebral ______ cerebral;
hermorrhagic ______ hemorrágico;
myocardial ______ del miocardio;
pulmonary ______ pulmonar.

infarct

n infarto
References in periodicals archive ?
Ophthalmologic findings in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy: A cross-sectional study.
Secondary endpoints were any vascular events, any cause of death, serious adverse events, new silent brain infarcts, and worsening of the modified Rankin Scale score.
The diagnosis of ESUS applied to patients with nonlacunar stroke (defined as subcortical infarcts [less than or equal to] 15 mm in cCTor [less than or equal to] 20 mm DWI-MR-imaging caused by small vessel occlusion), absence of extra- or intracranial [greater than or equal to] 50% luminal stenosis proximal to the infarct, major-risk cardioembolic source of embolism (including the absence of atrial fibrillation in the first 24 h of the 7 d Holter), and other specific causes of stroke [9] (see the following list).
Arterial thrombosis manifested as splenic infarcts (n = 4) and renal infarct (n = 1).
We report a case of an 81-year-old man with a PTA arising from the left cavernous ICA supplying the mid-distal basilar artery, with acute infarcts in both the ICA and PTA territories.
Patients with clinical features suggestive of transient ischemic attack (TIA), intracranial hemorrhage, lacunar infarcts, bilateral infarcts, multiple infarcts, anterior cerebral artery territory infarcts and posterior circulation strokes were excluded from the study.
Infarcts in the lower pontine region have greater likelihood of causing more damage because of the proximity to the corticospinal tract (Oh et al., 2012).
Strokes are divided into three types: cardiogenic, atherothrombotic, and lacunar infarcts. Cardiogenic infarct is caused by emboli from the heart.
The study authors write: "Purpose in life may affect risk for cerebral infarcts, specifically macroscopic lacunar infarcts.
Writing in the May 2015 issue of Stroke, researchers who studied more than 900 participants of the Framingham Heart Study found evidence of smaller brain structure and of covert brain infarcts, a type of "silent" ischemic stroke resulting from a blockage in the blood vessels supplying the brain.
Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a hereditary vascular disorder, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, clinically characterized by a number of following symptoms: migraine with aura, mood disorder, vascular dementia, ischemic stroke and premature death [1-4].