inference


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in·fer·ence

 (ĭn′fər-əns)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of deriving logical conclusions from premises known or assumed to be true.
b. The act of reasoning from factual knowledge or evidence.
2.
a. Something inferred.
b. Usage Problem A hint or suggestion: The editorial contained an inference of foul play in the awarding of the contract. See Usage Note at infer.

inference

(ˈɪnfərəns; -frəns)
n
1. the act or process of inferring
2. an inferred conclusion, deduction, etc
3. (Logic) any process of reasoning from premises to a conclusion
4. (Logic) logic the specific mode of reasoning used. See also deduction4, induction4

in•fer•ence

(ˈɪn fər əns, -frəns)

n.
1. the act or process of inferring.
2. something that is inferred.
3. Logic.
a. the process of deriving from assumed premises either the strict logical conclusion or one that is to some degree probable.
b. a proposition reached by a process of inference.
[1585–95; < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inference - the reasoning involved in drawing a conclusion or making a logical judgment on the basis of circumstantial evidence and prior conclusions rather than on the basis of direct observation
abstract thought, logical thinking, reasoning - thinking that is coherent and logical
analogy - an inference that if things agree in some respects they probably agree in others
corollary - (logic) an inference that follows directly from the proof of another proposition
derivation - a line of reasoning that shows how a conclusion follows logically from accepted propositions
entailment, implication, deduction - something that is inferred (deduced or entailed or implied); "his resignation had political implications"
extrapolation - an inference about the future (or about some hypothetical situation) based on known facts and observations
presumption - (law) an inference of the truth of a fact from other facts proved or admitted or judicially noticed

inference

noun deduction, conclusion, assumption, reading, consequence, presumption, conjecture, surmise, corollary There were two inferences to be drawn from her letter.

inference

noun
A position arrived at by reasoning from premises or general principles:
Translations
إسْتِدْلال، إسْتِنْتاج
dedukcezávěr
følgeslutningslutning
ályktun
sonuç/anlam

inference

[ˈɪnfərəns] Ndeducción f, inferencia f
by inferencepor deducción
to draw inferencessacar conclusiones
to draw an inference from sthhacer una deducción de algo

inference

[ˈɪnfərəns] n
(= deduction) → conclusion f
to draw an inference from sth → tirer une conclusion de qch
the inference is that ... → on doit en conclure que ...
by inference → par déduction

inference

nSchluss (→ folgerung f) m; it has a tiny head and, by inference, a tiny braines hat einen winzigen Kopf und demzufolge ein winziges Gehirn; he said, by inference, that …implizit sagte er, dass …

inference

[ˈɪnfrns] ndeduzione f, illazione f

infer

(inˈfəː) past tense, past participle inˈferred verb
to judge (from facts or evidence). I inferred from your silence that you were angry.
ˈinference noun
References in classic literature ?
Again, there is a composite kind of recognition involving false inference on the part of one of the characters, as in the Odysseus Disguised as a Messenger.
Karnegie's lawyer, the inference appeared to be, that "Mrs.
The inference is, that the authority of the Union, and the affections of the citizens towards it, will be strengthened, rather than weakened, by its extension to what are called matters of internal concern; and will have less occasion to recur to force, in proportion to the familiarity and comprehensiveness of its agency.
Neither is it a very far-fetched inference that a man who inherits one article of such value is pretty well provided for in other respects.
That the dog behaves in this way is matter of observation, but that it "knows" or "remembers" anything is an inference, and in fact a very doubtful one.
Is it, then, stretching our inference too far to say that the presentation was on the occasion of the change?
No fragments which can be identified as belonging to the first period survive to give us even a general idea of the history of the earliest epic, and we are therefore thrown back upon the evidence of analogy from other forms of literature and of inference from the two great epics which have come down to us.
Although, in most of these examples, the system has been so dissimilar from that under consideration as greatly to weaken any inference concerning the latter from the fate of the former, yet, as the States will retain, under the proposed Constitution, a very extensive portion of active sovereignty, the inference ought not to be wholly disregarded.
Upon this foundation this book is recommended to the reader as a work from every part of which something may be learned, and some just and religious inference is drawn, by which the reader will have something of instruction, if he pleases to make use of it.
A dull mind, once arriving at an inference that flatters a desire, is rarely able to retain the impression that the notion from which the inference started was purely problematic.
For though other species of whales find their food above water, and may be seen by man in the act of feeding, the spermaceti whale obtains his whole food in unknown zones below the surface; and only by inference is it that any one can tell of what, precisely, that food consists.
For, not to hint of this: that it is an inference from certain canonic teachings, that while some natural enjoyments here shall have no children born to them for the other world, but, on the contrary, shall be followed by the joy-childlessness of all hell's despair; whereas, some guilty mortal miseries shall still fertilely beget to themselves an eternally progressive progeny of griefs beyond the grave; not at all to hint of this, there still seems an inequality in the deeper analysis of the thing.