inferential


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in·fer·en·tial

 (ĭn′fə-rĕn′shəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or involving inference.
2. Derived or capable of being derived by inference.

in′fer·en′tial·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

inferential

(ˌɪnfəˈrɛnʃəl)
adj
of, relating to, or derived from inference
ˌinferˈentially adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•fer•en•tial

(ˌɪn fəˈrɛn ʃəl)

adj.
of, pertaining to, by, or dependent upon inference.
[1650–60]
in`fer•en′tial•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inferential - relating to or having the nature of illation or inference; "the illative faculty of the mind"
2.inferential - of reasoning; proceeding from general premisses to a necessary and specific conclusion
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
deductive - involving inferences from general principles
3.inferential - resembling or dependent on or arrived at by inference; "an illative conclusion"; "inferential reasoning"
deductive - involving inferences from general principles
4.inferential - derived or capable of being derived by inference
connotative - having the power of implying or suggesting something in addition to what is explicit
5.inferential - based on interpretation; not directly expressed
constructive - constructing or tending to construct or improve or promote development; "constructive criticism"; "a constructive attitude"; "a constructive philosophy"; "constructive permission"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

inferential

adjective
Presumed to be true, real, or genuine, especially on inconclusive grounds:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

inferential

[ˌɪnfəˈrenʃəl] ADJilativo, deductivo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

inferential

adj statistics, thinkingauf Schlussfolgerungen beruhend
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Our perception is made up of sensations, images and beliefs, but the supposed "object" is something inferential, externally related, not logically bound up with what is occurring in us.
It is necessary to Knight Dunlap's position to maintain that this additional knowledge is purely inferential, but he makes no attempt to show how the inference is possible.
In justice to young Halpin it should be said that while in him were pretty faithfully reproduced most of the mental and moral characteristics ascribed by history and family tradition to the famous Colonial bard, his succession to the gift and faculty divine was purely inferential. Not only had he never been known to court the muse, but in truth he could not have written correctly a line of verse to save himself from the Killer of the Wise.
For Martin Poyser felt no motive to keep silence towards the one or two neighbours who ventured to come and shake him sorrowfully by the hand on the first day of his trouble; and Carroll, who kept his ears open to all that passed at the rectory, had framed an inferential version of the story, and found early opportunities of communicating it.
The dialogue's debate about sfphrosuneand self-knowledge concerns familiar issues and confronts straightforward difficulties, they say, and they have rendered as clearly as possible the argument's inferential steps within the limits of fidelity to the Greek.
Cloth, $149.00--In this book Giacomo Turbanti aims to provide his reader with "the resources to find her way around the edifice of Brandom's normative inferentialism." To this end, he situates normative inferentialism in the context of three Brandomian movements of thought: his normative pragmatics, his inferential semantics, and his rational expressivism.
A reading comprehension test, based on Barrett's and Day and Park's taxonomies of reading comprehension, was developed by focusing on literal, reorganization and inferential reading comprehension skills.
Results of this study indicate that cross-sectional study design, bivariate inferential statistical analysis entailing comparison between two variables/groups, and use of statistical software programme SPSS to be the most common study design, inferential statistical analysis, and statistical analysis software programmes, respectively.
Several authors have discussed ongoing challenges with small sample sizes in between-groups zoological research and have cautioned against the inappropriate use of inferential statistics (Shepherdson, 2003, International Zoo Yearbook, 38, 118-124; Shepherdson, Lewis, Carlstead, et al., 2013, Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 147, 298-277; Swaisgood, 2007, Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 102, 139-162; Swaisgood, Shepherdson, 2005, Zoo Biology, 24, 499-518).
Inferential computations made at the edge of a system, can be communicated to a central node to reduce wireless transmissions needed and enable real-time decisions when critical system events occur.