inferior conjunction

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inferior conjunction

n.
The position of an inferior planet (Mercury or Venus) when it lies on a direct line between Earth and the sun and on the same side of the sun as Earth.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inferior conjunction - (astronomy) the alignment of the Earth and a planet on the same side of the sun
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
alignment, conjunction - (astronomy) apparent meeting or passing of two or more celestial bodies in the same degree of the zodiac
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References in periodicals archive ?
Circling the Sun almost 30% closer than Earth does, on average, Venus has a shorter orbital period and "laps" our planet at regular intervals, passing between Earth and the Sun in events known as inferior conjunctions. Over an interval of 8 years, Venus orbits the Sun almost exactly 13 times and swings through inferior conjunction five times.
Also, when Venus passes within about 8' ([absolute value of [d.sub.m]] <0.50) of the Sun's centre at the ascending node or within about 4' ([absolute value of [d.sub.m]] <0.25) at the descending node, at the inferior conjunctions occur ring eight years either side, the planet misses the solar disk and no transit occurs.
For more information, there are two types of conjunction occurs for our solar system planets, Superior and Inferior conjunctions; where Superior conjunction occurs for all solar system planets, while Inferior conjunction occurs for two planets only (Mercury and Venus), because they orbits around the sun are inside Earth's orbit.
You will find here, among others, a list of the inferior conjunctions of Venus from AD 391 to 1999, a tabulation of bright, high-amplitude variable stars, a formula for converting Gregorian dates to Julian Day numbers, and the very important equations for archaeoastronomy, namely, how to convert from equatorial to horizon coordinates.
During that 8-year period, five inferior conjunctions occur, 584 days apart on average.

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