infinitive


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to infinitive: bare infinitive, split infinitive

infinitive

An infinitive is the most basic form of a verb. It is “unmarked” (which means that it is not conjugated for tense or person), and it is preceded by the particle to.
Infinitives are known as non-finite verbs, meaning they do not express actions being performed by the subjects of clauses. Instead, infinitives function as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs to describe actions as ideas.
Infinitives are distinct from a similar construction known as bare infinitives or the base forms of verbs, which are simply infinitives without the particle to.
Continue reading...

in·fin·i·tive

 (ĭn-fĭn′ĭ-tĭv)
n. Abbr. inf. or infin.
A verb form that functions as a substantive while retaining certain verbal characteristics, such as modification by adverbs, and that in English may be preceded by to, as in To go willingly is to show strength or We want him to work harder, or may also occur without to, as in She had them read the letter or We may finish today. See Usage Note at split infinitive.

[From Middle English infinitif, of an infinitive, from Old French, from Late Latin īnfīnītīvus, unlimited, indefinite, infinitive, from Latin īnfīnītus, infinite; see infinite.]

infinitive

(ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv)
n
(Grammar) a form of the verb not inflected for grammatical categories such as tense and person and used without an overt subject. In English, the infinitive usually consists of the word to followed by the verb
infinitival adj
inˈfinitively, ˌinfiniˈtivally adv

in•fin•i•tive

(ɪnˈfɪn ɪ tɪv)
n.
1. a nonfinite verb form, in many languages the simple or basic form of the verb, that names the action or state without specifying the subject and that functions as a noun or is used with auxiliary verbs or, in English, after the word to, as eat in I want to eat.
adj.
2. consisting of or containing an infinitive: an infinitive clause. Abbr.: infin.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Late Latin infīnītīvus, derivative of Latin infīnīt(us) indefinite, infinitival]

infinitive

The basic uninflected form of a verb, usually accompanied by “to” as in “to be.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infinitive - the uninflected form of the verb
split infinitive - an infinitive with an adverb between `to' and the verb (e.g., `to boldly go')
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
Translations
صيغَة المَصْدَرمَصْدَرٌ
infinitivneurčitek
infinitivnavnemåde
infinitiivi
infinitiv
fõnévi igenévfőnévi igenév
nafnháttur
不定詞
부정사
bendratis
infinitīvs, nenoteiksme
infinitiv
neurčitok
nedoločnik
infinitiv
รูปกริยาที่ตั้งต้นด้วย to
fiilin ...-mek/mak hâlimastarsonsuz
nguyên thể

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv]
A. ADJ (Ling) → infinitivo
B. Ninfinitivo m

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv] n (GRAMMAR) [verb] → infinitif m

infinitive

(Gram)
adjInfinitiv-, infinitivisch; infinitive formInfinitivform f
nInfinitiv m, → Grundform f; in the infinitiveim Infinitiv

infinitive

[ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv]
1. adj (Gram) → infinito/a
2. ninfinito
in the infinitive → all'infinito

infinitive

(inˈfinətiv) noun
the part of the verb used in English with or without to, that expresses an action but has no subject. The sentence `You need not stay if you want to go' contains two infinitives, stay and go.

infinitive

مَصْدَرٌ infinitiv infinitiv Infinitiv απαρέμφατο infinitivo infinitiivi infinitif infinitiv infinito 不定詞 부정사 infinitief infinitiv bezokolicznik infinitivo неопределенная форма глагола infinitiv รูปกริยาที่ตั้งต้นด้วย to sonsuz nguyên thể 不定词
References in classic literature ?
You are so impatient, sir, you would come at the infinitive mood before you can get to the imperative.
Ray Vazquez is the CEO of Infinitive Insight, the enterprise risk management practice at Infinitive, a Northern Virginia-based consultancy.
Yet, despite such a broad discussion, the text fails to adequately explain a few important issues (e.g., the verbal aspects and the various uses of the cases and the infinitive).
Split Infinitives. The English-speaking world may be divided into (1) those who neither know nor care what a split infinitive is; (2) those who do not know, but care very much; (3) those who know and condemn; (4) those who know and approve; and (5) those who know and distinguish.
Among the topics are the vernacular practice of naming the liturgical year, comparing the versions of the Old English Gospels in a semantic and syntactic study of periphrastic "model verb + infinitive" construction, metrical influences on constructions with complex predicates in Old English hypermetric verse, the pronoun it and the dating of Middle English texts, and changes in the clausal complement of the copulative perception verbs in American English.
It carries out infinitive frequency control according to the requirement to realize the best effect.
(1) Lintu laula-a helkyttel-i bird sing-INF IdPh-PAST.3SG (2) 'The bird sang like a small bell' (2) Mina sinne lume-en kaatu-a tupsahd-i-n I there snow-ILL fall-INF IdPh-PAST-1SG 'I tumbled into the snow' (with a soft, sudden, unexpected thud) (3) Yrjola-n aija puhu-a lassytt-i Yrjola-GEN old.man talk-INF IdP -PAST.3SG 'The old Yrjola geezer babbled on' (Sillanpaa, Nobel laureate, 1919) The construction obeys a particular morphosyntactic restriction: the Vii must be inflected for tense and person, while Vi has to be in infinitive form.
A most interesting feature which caught my attention is the fact that the editor systematically adapted the future active participle in the future active infinitive to its subject (34/21, p.
Looking back, I feel a little sorry for Thomas Aquinas, for, when attempting to describe Ultimate Reality, God--as much as one can describe the indescribable-he had to use the uninflected, infinitive form of the verb "to be," esse: Ipsum Esse Subsistens, literally word-for-word: "Itself to be subsisting." In more understandable English, "Being itself subsisting." If he could have used modern English, he could have much more effectively stated: God is "Being subsisting of itself." The infinitive form esse clearly was meant to carry a totally open-ended quality, but its very structure communicates "static." We English speakers (whether native-born or later-learned) ought to be in awe of our linguistic ancestors for bestowing on us the dialogic gilt of "being."
the infinitive, the substantive and the that-clause) will be studied (see Table 2).
Clark added: "The internet affords infinitive opportunities and we urge marketers to fast appreciate this or face being left behind.