infinitive marker

infinitive marker

n
(Grammar) grammar a word or affix occurring with the verb stem in the infinitive, such as to in to make
References in periodicals archive ?
(11), with the infinitive marker for to rather than just to.
According to Fischer, this change from o to to can be explained from a twofold perspective: (a) the on-going diffusion of to as an infinitive marker after the disappearance of nominal case forms, which progressively blurred the original difference between to and o (1997, 126); and (b) the substitution of that-clauses by infinitival complements, which also spearheaded the standardisation of the to-infinitive in Middle English (Manabe 1989, 54; Fischer 1996a, 253; Fischer 2000, 162; also Los 2005, 179-190).
Here is an example of infinitive marker from the morphology of these languages: Limbu [Yakthumba] '-ma', Athapare '-ma', Bantawa '-ma', Rodung [Caroling] '-ma', Thulung '-mu', Khaling '-ha' (p.55), Wambule [RaDhu] '-cam', Jerung 'kha' (Rai 2002), and Koits [Sunuwar] '-ca' and Bayung [Babing] 'co' (my data).
Concerning the morphological infinitive marker in Russian, this is unambiguously expressed by the suffix -t'.
In "To throw the ball is good," "To" is an infinitive marker, a function beyond the purview of the eight parts of speech.
to (both as a preposition and as an infinitive marker)
(1985: 687) have also explicitly claimed that the infinitive marker to may be viewed as related to the spatial preposition to through metaphorical connection.
(13d) shows that the cause for this change is loss of the infinitive marker -an (later -en), which produces a morphological deficiency and the change of parametric value.
Notably, the infinitive marker a `to' must be omitted in this construction, as in (18c), showing further proof of the reduced inflectional domain.
participle -k[??] upon deletion of the infinitive marker -eb (e.g.
The table above shows that to is much more common than for to as the infinitive marker in all authors but two.