infirmity


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in·fir·mi·ty

 (ĭn-fûr′mĭ-tē)
n. pl. in·fir·mi·ties
1.
a. The condition of being infirm, often as associated with old age; weakness or frailty: the infirmity brought on by the disease.
b. A bodily ailment or weakness: complained about his infirmities.
2.
a. Weakness of resolution or character: the infirmity inherent in human nature.
b. A moral failing or defect in character: the infirmities and depravities of corrupt nobles.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

infirmity

(ɪnˈfɜːmɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the state or quality of being infirm
2. physical weakness or debility; frailty
3. a moral flaw or failing
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•fir•mi•ty

(ɪnˈfɜr mɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. a physical weakness or ailment: the infirmities of age.
2. the quality or state of being infirm; lack of strength.
3. a moral weakness or failing.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infirmity - the state of being weak in health or body (especially from old age)
unfitness, softness - poor physical condition; being out of shape or out of condition (as from a life of ease and luxury)
asthenia, astheny - an abnormal loss of strength
cachexia, cachexy, wasting - any general reduction in vitality and strength of body and mind resulting from a debilitating chronic disease
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

infirmity

noun
1. frailty, ill health, debility, deficiency, imperfection, feebleness, decrepitude, sickliness In spite of his age and infirmity, he is still producing plays.
frailty health, strength, vigour, wellness, soundness
2. ailment, failing, weakness, fault, disorder, defect, sickness, malady Older people often try to ignore their infirmities.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

infirmity

noun
1. A pathological condition of mind or body:
3. The condition of being sick:
4. An imperfection of character:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
عاهَه، نَقيصَه، عَجْز
neduživostslabost
svagelighed
alkati gyengeség
heilsuveila, veikindi
dermansızlıkhastalıkzayıflık

infirmity

[ɪnˈfɜːmɪtɪ] N (= state) → debilidad f; (= illness) → enfermedad f, achaque m, dolencia f; (= moral) → flaqueza f
mental/physical infirmityenfermedad f mental/física
the infirmities of (old) agelos achaques de la vejez
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

infirmity

[ɪnˈfɜːrmɪti] ninfirmité f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

infirmity

nGebrechlichkeit f; the infirmities of (old) agedie Altersgebrechen pl; his infirmity of purpose (liter)seine Willensschwäche, sein Mangel man Zielstrebigkeit
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

infirmity

[ɪnˈfɜːmɪtɪ] ninfermità f inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

infirm

(inˈfəːm) adjective
(of a person) weak or ill. elderly and infirm people.
inˈfirmaryplural inˈfirmaries noun
a name given to some hospitals.
inˈfirmityplural inˈfirmities noun
weakness or illness.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

in·firm·i·ty

n. enfermedad.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
When is a man to be safe from such wit, if age and infirmity will not protect him?"
"Infirmity!" said Elinor, "do you call Colonel Brandon infirm?
However, having an infirmity - for I am hard of hearing, sir--"
" - Yes, hard of hearing; having that infirmity coming upon me, my son he went into the Law, and he took charge of me, and he by little and little made out this elegant and beautiful property.
All that need be remarked is, that a body which is to correct this infirmity ought itself to be free from it, and consequently ought to be less numerous.
Love is never quite devoid of sentimentality, and Strickland was the least inclined to that infirmity of any man I have known.
If she could afford to reside as a lodger in--vicarage, she would choose that house before all others as the place of her abode; but not being so circumstanced, she would never come under its roof, except as an occasional visitor: unless sickness or calamity should render her assistance really needful, or until age or infirmity made her incapable of maintaining herself.
With the customary infirmity of temper that characterizes this unhappy fowl, she appears by the fierceness of her beak and eye, and the general truculency of her attitude, to threaten mischief to the inoffensive community; and especially to warn all citizens careful of their safety against intruding on the premises which she overshadows with her wings.
As they drew near, the widow recognized in every face some trait of former friends, long forgotten, but now returning, as if from their old graves, to warn her to prepare a shroud; or, with purpose almost as unwelcome, to exhibit their wrinkles and infirmity, and claim her as their companion by the tokens of her own decay.
Because of his horrible infirmity, you have let yourselves become his slaves.
Forgive me and have pity on my folly, and remember I know but little, and, if I talk much, it's more from infirmity than malice; but he who sins and mends commends himself to God."
The symptoms of the infirmity are much the same in every case, but the affliction itself is variously termed.