inflation

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in·fla·tion

 (ĭn-flā′shən)
n.
1. The act of inflating or the state of being inflated.
2.
a. A persistent increase in the level of consumer prices or a persistent decline in the purchasing power of money.
b. The rate at which this increase occurs, expressed as a percentage over a period of time, usually a year.

in·fla′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

inflation

(ɪnˈfleɪʃən)
n
1. the act of inflating or state of being inflated
2. (Economics) economics a progressive increase in the general level of prices brought about by an expansion in demand or the money supply (demand-pull inflation) or by autonomous increases in costs (cost-push inflation). Compare deflation
3. (Economics) informal the rate of increase of prices
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•fla•tion

(ɪnˈfleɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a steady rise in the level of prices related to an increased volume of money and credit and resulting in a loss of value of currency (opposed to deflation).
2. the act of inflating.
3. the state of being inflated.
[1300–50; Middle English < Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

inflation

A rise in the general level of prices. Galloping inflation (or hyperinflation) is an inflation which precedes at a high rate but perhaps for only a brief period. The rate of inflation generally increases during a galloping inflation. Creeping inflation is an inflation which lasts for a long time at a fairly steady pace.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inflation - a general and progressive increase in pricesinflation - a general and progressive increase in prices; "in inflation everything gets more valuable except money"
cost-pull inflation - inflation caused by an increase in the costs of production
demand-pull inflation - inflation caused by an increase in demand or in the supply of money
economic process - any process affecting the production and development and management of material wealth
reflation - inflation of currency after a period of deflation; restore the system to a previous state
stagflation - a period of slow economic growth and high unemployment (stagnation) while prices rise (inflation)
deflation - a contraction of economic activity resulting in a decline of prices
disinflation - a reduction of prices intended to improve the balance of payments
2.inflation - (cosmology) a brief exponential expansion of the universe (faster than the speed of light) postulated to have occurred shortly after the big bang
cosmogeny, cosmogony, cosmology - the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution and structure of the universe
blowup, detonation, explosion - a violent release of energy caused by a chemical or nuclear reaction
3.inflation - lack of elegance as a consequence of being pompous and puffed up with vanity
inelegance - the quality of lacking refinement and good taste
4.inflation - the act of filling something with air
enlargement, expansion - the act of increasing (something) in size or volume or quantity or scope
deflation - the act of letting the air out of something
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

inflation

noun increase, expansion, extension, swelling, escalation, enlargement, intensification Such pressure leads to the inflation of course-work marks.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
تَضَخُّمتَضَخُّمٌنَفْخ، إنْتِفاخ
inflacenafouknutí
inflationoppustning
inflacio
inflaatiolaajentuminen
inflacija
inflációfelfújás
inflation
inflasi
uppblásturverîbólga
インフレーションインフレ
인플레이션
inflácianafúknutie
inflacijanapihovanje
inflation
ภาวะเงินเฟ้อ
enflasyonenflâsyonşişirilmeşişme
lạm phátthổi phồng

inflation

[ɪnˈfleɪʃən]
A. N (Econ) → inflación f
B. CPD inflation accounting Ncontabilidad f de inflación
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

inflation

[ɪnˈfleɪʃən] ninflation f
Inflation is rising → L'inflation augmente.
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

inflation

n
(Econ) → Inflation f; inflation rateInflationsrate f; to fight inflationdie Inflation bekämpfen
(= act of inflating) (with pump) → Aufpumpen nt; (by mouth) → Aufblasen nt; (Econ: of prices) → Steigern nt, → Hochtreiben nt; (fig)Steigern nt, → Erhöhen nt; (of ego)Aufblähen nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

inflation

[ɪnˈfleɪʃn] n (Econ) → inflazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

inflate

(inˈfleit) verb
to blow up or expand (especially a balloon, tyre or lungs with air). He used a bicycle pump to inflate the ball.
inˈflatable adjective
(of eg a cushion, ball etc) that can be filled with air for use. an inflatable beach ball.
inˈflation noun
1. the process of inflating or being inflated.
2. a situation in country's economy where prices and wages keep forcing each other to increase.
inˈflationary adjective
relating to economic inflation.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

inflation

تَضَخُّمٌ inflace inflation Inflation πληθωρισμός inflación inflaatio inflation inflacija inflazione インフレーション 인플레이션 inflatie inflasjon inflacja inflação инфляция inflation ภาวะเงินเฟ้อ enflasyon lạm phát 通货膨胀
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

in·fla·tion

n. inflación, distensión.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The stalking horse for the inflationists was the agriculture bill.
This explains, writes Forder, 'what those few Phillips curve inflationists had in mind' (p.
Courcelle Seneuil and Coquelin were inflationists and they defended free banking for this reason, espousing a restrictionist theory of crises.
(2) Terminology varies a lot here: Bayne (2009) labels the positions adopted as those of "phenomenal conservatives" versus "phenomenal liberals", Kriegel (2015) prefers "phenomenological inflationists" versus "phenomenological deflationists", and Siewert (2011) talks about "inclusivism" versus "exclusivism".
This difference used to be very easy to delineate, with deflationists denying, and inflationists asserting, that truth is a property, but more recently the debate has become more complicated, owing primarily to the fact that many contemporary deflationists often do allow for truth to be considered a property.
This act, along with the Sherman Silver Purchase Act of 1890 which replaced it, were designed to simultaneously mollify the silver mining interests of the western United States and the silver inflationists throughout the country (Timberlake, 1993, pp.166-70)
Bernanke is a Keynesian, and Keynesians are inflationists. The question every advisor should be asking their clients is, "Where do you want to be positioned in order to best protect your wealth and purchasing power?" When do you want to buy inflation protection?
Rothbard even describes avant lettre Keynesian schemes of public spending among the inflationists. Public spending was advocated by them, even if it was not necessary or conducive to better productivity in general, such as "pyramid building or digging holes in the ground" (p.