inflection

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inflection

Grammatical inflection (sometimes known as accidence or flection in more traditional grammars) is the way in which a word is changed or altered in form in order to achieve a new, specific meaning.
Verbs are the most commonly inflected words, changing form to reflect grammatical tense, as well as mood, voice, aspect, person, and speech. Collectively, this is known as conjugation.
The other parts of speech that can undergo inflection are nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and adverbs. These are categorized collectively under the term declension.
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inflection

an alteration in pitch or tone of the voice; a change in the form of a word indicating number, person, or tense
Not to be confused with:
infliction – impose something painful or unwelcome upon; physical assault
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

in·flec·tion

 (ĭn-flĕk′shən)
n.
1. The act of inflecting or the state of being inflected.
2. Alteration in pitch or tone of the voice.
3. Grammar
a. An alteration of the form of a word by the addition of an affix, as in English dogs from dog, or by changing the form of a base, as in English spoke from speak, that indicates grammatical features such as number, person, mood, or tense.
b. An affix indicating such a grammatical feature, as the -s in the English third person singular verb form speaks.
c. The paradigm of a word.
d. A pattern of forming paradigms, such as noun inflection or verb inflection.
4. A turning or bending away from a course or position of alignment.

in·flec′tion·al adj.
in·flec′tion·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

inflection

(ɪnˈflɛkʃən) or

inflexion

n
1. modulation of the voice
2. (Grammar) (grammar) a change in the form of a word, usually modification or affixation, signalling change in such grammatical functions as tense, voice, mood, person, gender, number, or case
3. an angle or bend
4. the act of inflecting or the state of being inflected
5. (Mathematics) maths a change in curvature from concave to convex or vice versa. See also point of inflection
inˈflectional, inˈflexional adj
inˈflectionally, inˈflexionally adv
inˈflectionless, inˈflexionless adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•flec•tion

(ɪnˈflɛk ʃən)

n.
1. modulation of the voice; change in pitch or tone of voice.
2.
a. the process of adding affixes to or changing the shape of a base to give it a different syntactic function without changing its form class, as in forming served from serve, sings from sing, or harder from hard (contrasted with derivation).
b. an affix added in this process, as the -s in dogs or the -ed in played.
c. an inflected form of a word.
d. the systematic description of the process of inflection in a language; accidence.
3. a bend or angle.
4. a change of curvature from convex to concave or vice versa.
Also, esp. Brit., inflexion.
[1525–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

inflection

A change in the form of a word that indicates a different tense or number.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inflection - a change in the form of a word (usually by adding a suffix) to indicate a change in its grammatical function
grammatical relation - a linguistic relation established by grammar
conjugation - the inflection of verbs
declension - the inflection of nouns and pronouns and adjectives in Indo-European languages
paradigm - systematic arrangement of all the inflected forms of a word
pluralisation, pluralization - the act of pluralizing or attributing plurality to
2.inflection - the patterns of stress and intonation in a language
manner of speaking, delivery, speech - your characteristic style or manner of expressing yourself orally; "his manner of speaking was quite abrupt"; "her speech was barren of southernisms"; "I detected a slight accent in his speech"
intonation, pitch contour, modulation - rise and fall of the voice pitch
caesura - a break or pause (usually for sense) in the middle of a verse line
enjambement, enjambment - the continuation of a syntactic unit from one line of verse into the next line without a pause
stress, accent, emphasis - the relative prominence of a syllable or musical note (especially with regard to stress or pitch); "he put the stress on the wrong syllable"
speech rhythm, rhythm - the arrangement of spoken words alternating stressed and unstressed elements; "the rhythm of Frost's poetry"
3.inflection - deviation from a straight or normal course
deviation, difference, divergence, departure - a variation that deviates from the standard or norm; "the deviation from the mean"
4.inflection - a manner of speaking in which the loudness or pitch or tone of the voice is modifiedinflection - a manner of speaking in which the loudness or pitch or tone of the voice is modified
manner of speaking, delivery, speech - your characteristic style or manner of expressing yourself orally; "his manner of speaking was quite abrupt"; "her speech was barren of southernisms"; "I detected a slight accent in his speech"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

inflection

noun
1. intonation, stress, emphasis, beat, measure, rhythm, cadence, modulation, accentuation His voice was devoid of inflection.
2. (Grammar) conjugation, declension Around 2 years, the child adds many grammatical inflections.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

inflection

noun
A particular vocal quality that indicates some emotion or feeling:
Idiom: tone of voice.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
flexeohýbání
afvigelsemodulation
flexióninflexiónpunto de inflexión
käännepistesuunnanmuutostaivutus
fleksijainfleksijaotklon
beygingraddblær
modulacjaodmiana

inflection

[ɪnˈflekʃən] Ninflexión f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

inflection

[ɪnˈflɛkʃən] n
[voice] → inflexion f
(GRAMMAR) (= ending) → désinence f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

inflection

[ɪnˈflɛkʃn] n (of voice) → intonazione f, modulazione f (Gram) → flessione f
the inflection of nouns/verbs → la flessione nominale/verbale
point of inflection (Math) → punto di flesso
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
He sighed and moaned like one under great suffering, and kept it up for a quarter of an hour; on purpose to distress his cousin apparently, for whenever he caught a stifled sob from her he put renewed pain and pathos into the inflexions of his voice.
You ought to be slapped and put to bed." There was an extraordinary earnestness in her tone and when she ceased I listened yet to the seductive inflexions of her voice, that no matter in what mood she spoke seemed only fit for tenderness and love.
I have once or twice seen sudden changes of expression on her pinched lips, and heard sudden inflexions of tone in her calm voice, which have led me to suspect that her present state of suppression may have sealed up something dangerous in her nature, which used to evaporate harmlessly in the freedom of her former life.
His cool, neg ligent undertone had no inflexions, but the strength of a powerful emotion made him ramble in his speech.
[Language in general includes the following parts:- Letter, Syllable, Connecting word, Noun, Verb, Inflexion or Case, Sentence or Phrase.
A pause; then with a new, yet still subdued inflexion of the voice--an inflexion which provoked while it pleased me --accompanied, too, by a "sourire a la fois fin et timide" in perfect harmony with the tone:--
I beseech you, then, not for love of me, for subjects should never weigh as anything in the balance which princes hold, but for love of yourself, to retain every syllable, every inflexion which, under the present most grave circumstances, will all have a sense and value as important as any every uttered in the world."
"Adieu, adieu, adieu," she said, without the soul communicating one single intelligent inflexion to the word.
He gave her a glimpse of his unconstrained self in the low vehement "You dare!" which sprang to his lips and out of them with a most menacing inflexion.