infrangible


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in·fran·gi·ble

 (ĭn-frăn′jə-bəl)
adj.
1. Difficult or impossible to break or separate into parts.
2. Inviolable: infrangible human rights.

[Late Latin īnfrangibilis : Latin in-, not; see in-1 + Latin frangere, to break; see bhreg- in Indo-European roots.]

in·fran′gi·bil′i·ty n.
in·fran′gi·bly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

infrangible

(ɪnˈfrændʒɪbəl)
adj
1. incapable of being broken
2. not capable of being violated or infringed
[C16: from Late Latin infrangibilis, from Latin in-1 + frangere to break]
inˌfrangiˈbility, inˈfrangibleness n
inˈfrangibly adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•fran•gi•ble

(ɪnˈfræn dʒə bəl)

adj.
1. incapable of being broken or separated.
2. inviolable.
[1590–1600; < Late Latin infrangibilis]
in•fran`gi•bil′i•ty, in•fran′gi•ble•ness, n.
in•fran′gi•bly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.infrangible - difficult or impossible to break or separate into parts; "an infrangible series"
unbreakable - impossible to break especially under ordinary usage; "unbreakable plastic dinnerwear"
2.infrangible - not capable of being violated or infringed; "infrangible human rights"
inalienable, unalienable - incapable of being repudiated or transferred to another; "endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

infrangible

adj (form) (= unbreakable)unzerbrechlich; (fig: = inviolable) → unverletzlich
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
We give our art an infrangible identity, an intrinsic and perhaps lasting longevity achieved not by flag waving or drum beating.
Given the significant onrush of 'fecundity' and productiveness in the corporate sector, our political leaders must undertake a responsibility pupilage on how exactly some corporate entities in a country are more productive, infrangible and sustainable than the countries where they exist.
Last Sunday he had blank-faced hacks digging out dictionaries when he spoke about telling his players about being "infrangible".
"The word I said to them was infrangible," he said.
Given Germany's own lack of a strong, immanent, infrangible national identity in his time, it is not surprising that Goethe was particularly aware of and open to the possibility of a super- or transnational literary modality.
Meillassoux in fact embraces a "precritical" philosophy in order to "revise decisions often considered as infrangible since Kant." (12) That we are supposed to look to precritical philosophy as an end run around the critical Kant is a compelling idea for theorists who can sense the persistent medievalite or "dogmatism" of modern thought.
La relation de discontinuite et de rupture que le changement de regime fait surgir dans la biographie de son protagoniste illustre le pouvoir qu'a l'evenement historique de briser le lien, qu'on pourrait naivement penser infrangible, entre un etre et le nom qu'il porte.
The centrality of the patient's perspective included Cartwright's infrangible position in relation to informed consent: "The patient must freely give consent to all treatment and research.
When departing from an airport in Class G airspace, if you're not following an Obstacle Departure Procedure (ODP), you are not guaranteed separation from anything infrangible. It's not necessarily unsafe, but it does bear some thought.
The Delta he plumbs is poor but infrangible; the blues still thrives there; and the region's racial legacy--as gnarled and complex as a sentence by William Faulkner--defies parsing.