infrared

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in·fra·red

 (ĭn′frə-rĕd′)
adj. Abbr. IR
1. Of or relating to electromagnetic radiation between microwaves and red visible light in the electromagnetic spectrum, having frequencies between 300 gigahertz and 400 terahertz and wavelengths between 1 millimeter and 750 nanometers.
2. Generating, using, or sensitive to infrared radiation.
n.
Infrared light or the infrared part of the spectrum.

infrared

(ˌɪnfrəˈrɛd)
n
(General Physics) the part of the electromagnetic spectrum with a longer wavelength than light but a shorter wavelength than radio waves; radiation with wavelength between 0.8 micrometres and 1 millimetre
adj
(General Physics) of, relating to, using, or consisting of radiation lying within the infrared: infrared radiation.

in`fra•red′

or in`fra-red′,



n.
1. the part of the invisible spectrum that is contiguous to the red end of the visible spectrum and that comprises electromagnetic radiation of wavelengths from 800 nm to 1 mm.
adj.
2. of, pertaining to, or using the infrared or its component rays: infrared radiation. Compare ultraviolet.
[1825–35]

in·fra·red

(ĭn′frə-rĕd′)
Relating to the invisible part of the electromagnetic spectrum with wavelengths longer than those of visible red light but shorter than those of microwaves. See more at electromagnetic spectrum.
Did You Know? In 1800 the astronomer Sir William Herschel discovered infrared light when he was exploring the relationship between heat and light. Herschel used a prism to split a beam of sunlight into a rainbow of colors (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet) and measured how hot a thermometer got when it was placed in each of the various bands. Then he tried placing the thermometer just outside the red band, where there was no visible color at all. The thermometer heated up, just as if light were shining on it. Further experiments showed that this invisible form of light behaved just like visible light in many ways; for example, it could be reflected by a mirror. We now call this form of light infrared light. Another kind of invisible light, ultraviolet light, is found just beyond the violet end of the spectrum.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infrared - the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum; electromagnetic wave frequencies below the visible range; "they could sense radiation in the infrared"
infrared spectrum - the spectrum of infrared radiation
frequence, frequency, oftenness - the number of occurrences within a given time period; "the frequency of modulation was 40 cycles per second"; "the frequency of his seizures increased as he grew older"
2.infrared - electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths longer than visible light but shorter than radio waves
actinic radiation, actinic ray - electromagnetic radiation that can produce photochemical reactions
Adj.1.infrared - having or employing wavelengths longer than light but shorter than radio waves; lying outside the visible spectrum at its red end; "infrared radiation"; "infrared photography"
invisible, unseeable - impossible or nearly impossible to see; imperceptible by the eye; "the invisible man"; "invisible rays"; "an invisible hinge"; "invisible mending"
Translations
infraroig
infračervený
infrarødinfrarød stråling
infrapuna
적외선
infrarødinfrarød stråling
infravermelho
infrarödinfraröd strålning

infrared

[ˈɪnfrəˈred] ADJ [rays, light] → infrarrojo

infrared

infra-red [ˌɪnfrəˈrɛd] adj
[light, radiation] → infrarouge
[equipment, sensor] → infrarouge; [camera] → infrarouge

infrared

adjinfrarot

infrared

[ˌɪnfrəˈrɛd]
1. adjinfrarosso/a
2. n (raggio) → infrarosso

infrared

adj infrarrojo
References in periodicals archive ?
Fortunately, some of these planets are very hot, thus emitting light, mostly at infrared wavelengths. Up to now, detections of this kind have only been made using the Spitzer infrared space telescope.
Andy Wijaya, graduate student in chemical engineering and lead author of the paper, said that since nanoparticles of different shapes respond to different infrared wavelengths, "just by controlling the infrared wavelength, we can choose the release time" for each drug.
Such galaxies are bathed in dust, which hides their visible light but causes them to glow brightly at infrared wavelengths.
Soaking up visible and ultraviolet starlight, the dust shines at infrared wavelengths. It's these debris disks that have grabbed the attention of Meyer, Lynne Hillenbrand of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, and a slew of other scientists.
Observations taken at several visible-light and infrared wavelengths suggest that it's likely to be one of the earliest galaxies ever found.
Further observations indicated that the visible-light cutoff was abrupt and that the glow remained bright over a range of infrared wavelengths, properties that only a remote galaxy could reproduce.
According to two Dutch astronomers, most or all of it may be ordinary molecular hydrogen (H2), which, unlike atomic hydrogen (H), is invisible except at certain infrared wavelengths.
The nightglow on Venus has been seen at infrared wavelengths before, betraying oxygen molecules and the hydroxyl radical, but this is the first detection of nitric oxide at those wavelengths.
Moreover, low-mass stars, being generally reddish, are relatively bright at infrared wavelengths. A computer analysis quantified the brightnesses and colors of some 7,000 of NGC 3603's stars, enabling Brandl and his colleagues to estimate their ages and masses.
The study combines BLAST submillimetre observations at wavelengths around 0.3 mm - between infrared and microwave wavelengths - with data at much shorter infrared wavelengths from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.
The images below, made at infrared wavelengths around 1.65 microns, resolve details as small as 0.04 arcsecond in a very tiny field of view.
Besides, different surfaces radiate different amounts of heat at infrared wavelengths due to a material characteristic known as emissivity, which varies in different materials.