infulae

Related to infulae: Battle of Britain

infulae

(ˈɪnfjʊliː)
pl n, sing -la (-lə)
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the two ribbons hanging from the back of a bishop's mitre
[C17: from Latin, plural of infula, woollen fillet worn on forehead by ancient Romans during religious rites]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the same way, the indication to strike with the hands over each shoulder and move them down over the chest ("strice mid pinre hande ofer aeoere eaxle niperweard ofer pine breost") (120) may be a stylized and almost arbitrary version of what originally was the proper depiction of the infulae or twin tabs on a bishop's mitre, just as the action of putting one's two fingers to one's eyes ("mon sette his twegen fingras on his twa eagan"), in the signs for master (5) and sacrist (6), may be a cultural emblem suggesting by agreement the actions of being in charge of someone, or looking after something.