infuriate


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in·fu·ri·ate

 (ĭn-fyo͝or′ē-āt′)
tr.v. in·fu·ri·at·ed, in·fu·ri·at·ing, in·fu·ri·ates
To make furious; enrage.
adj. (ĭn-fyo͝or′ē-ĭt) Archaic
Furious.

[Medieval Latin īnfuriāre, īnfuriāt- : Latin in-, intensive pref.; see in-2 + Latin furiāre, to enrage (from furia, fury; see fury).]

in·fu′ri·at′ing·ly adv.
in·fu′ri·a′tion n.

infuriate

vb
(tr) to anger; annoy
adj
archaic furious; infuriated
[C17: from Medieval Latin infuriāre (vb); see in-2, fury]
inˈfuriately adv
inˈfuriˌating adj
inˈfuriatingly adv
inˌfuriˈation n

in•fu•ri•ate

(v. ɪnˈfyʊər iˌeɪt; adj. -ɪt)

v. -at•ed, -at•ing,
adj. v.t.
1. to make furious; enrage.
adj.
2. Archaic. infuriated.
[1660–70; < Medieval Latin infuriātus, past participle of infuriāre to madden]
syn: See enrage.

infuriate


Past participle: infuriated
Gerund: infuriating

Imperative
infuriate
infuriate
Present
I infuriate
you infuriate
he/she/it infuriates
we infuriate
you infuriate
they infuriate
Preterite
I infuriated
you infuriated
he/she/it infuriated
we infuriated
you infuriated
they infuriated
Present Continuous
I am infuriating
you are infuriating
he/she/it is infuriating
we are infuriating
you are infuriating
they are infuriating
Present Perfect
I have infuriated
you have infuriated
he/she/it has infuriated
we have infuriated
you have infuriated
they have infuriated
Past Continuous
I was infuriating
you were infuriating
he/she/it was infuriating
we were infuriating
you were infuriating
they were infuriating
Past Perfect
I had infuriated
you had infuriated
he/she/it had infuriated
we had infuriated
you had infuriated
they had infuriated
Future
I will infuriate
you will infuriate
he/she/it will infuriate
we will infuriate
you will infuriate
they will infuriate
Future Perfect
I will have infuriated
you will have infuriated
he/she/it will have infuriated
we will have infuriated
you will have infuriated
they will have infuriated
Future Continuous
I will be infuriating
you will be infuriating
he/she/it will be infuriating
we will be infuriating
you will be infuriating
they will be infuriating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been infuriating
you have been infuriating
he/she/it has been infuriating
we have been infuriating
you have been infuriating
they have been infuriating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been infuriating
you will have been infuriating
he/she/it will have been infuriating
we will have been infuriating
you will have been infuriating
they will have been infuriating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been infuriating
you had been infuriating
he/she/it had been infuriating
we had been infuriating
you had been infuriating
they had been infuriating
Conditional
I would infuriate
you would infuriate
he/she/it would infuriate
we would infuriate
you would infuriate
they would infuriate
Past Conditional
I would have infuriated
you would have infuriated
he/she/it would have infuriated
we would have infuriated
you would have infuriated
they would have infuriated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.infuriate - make furiousinfuriate - make furious        
anger - make angry; "The news angered him"

infuriate

verb enrage, anger, provoke, irritate, incense, gall, madden, exasperate, rile, nark (Brit., Austral., & N.Z. slang), be like a red rag to a bull, make your blood boil, get your goat (slang), make your hackles rise, raise your hackles, get your back up, make you see red (informal), put your back up It infuriated her to have to deal with this man.
calm, soothe, appease, placate, pacify, mollify, propitiate

infuriate

verb
To cause to feel or show anger:
Idioms: make one hot under the collar, make one's blood boil, put one's back up.
Translations
يُغْضِب، يُغيظ
rozzuřit
gøre rasende
razbjesnitirazbješnjivatiražešćivatiražestiti
gera bálreiîan
siutinamaisiutinantis
sakaitinātsaniknotsatracināt
çileden çıkarmakçok kızdırmak

infuriate

[ɪnˈfjʊərɪeɪt] VTenfurecer, poner furioso
to be/get infuriatedestar/ponerse furioso
this kind of thing infuriates meestas cosas me ponen furioso
at times you infuriate mehay veces que me sacas de quicio

infuriate

[ɪnˈfjʊərieɪt] vtrendre furieux/euse
it infuriates me that ... → cela me hérisse que ...

infuriate

vtwütend or rasend machen, zur Raserei bringen; to be/get infuriatedwütend or rasend sein/werden

infuriate

[ɪnˈfjʊərɪˌeɪt] vtfar infuriare, rendere furioso/a
to become infuriated → infuriarsi, andare in bestia

infuriate

(inˈfjuərieit) verb
to make very angry. I was infuriated by his words.
inˈfuriating adjective
I find his silly jokes infuriating.
inˈfuriatingly adverb
References in classic literature ?
His conduct served only the more to infuriate the pigs.
Our own dailies infuriate the reader, pretty often; the German daily only stupefies him.
Mirecki, who remains a professor at the university, caused outrage when it was revealed that he had an ulterior motive in teaching the course, "Special Topics in Religion: Intelligent Design and Creationism." Faculty members approved the course after the words "and other Religious Mythologies" were removed from its title, but in e-mails to a student group, Mirecki revealed that he planned the course to teach so-called "intelligent design" theory as mythology to infuriate fundamentalists.
Frances Cress Welsing is "an intellectual buffoon of the first order." Now, if that isn't enough to infuriate true believers, the acerbic critic has more put-downs for black athletic "knot-heads" and "imbecilic" Farrakanians and Sharptonites.
Network Rail is now doing its best to infuriate residents in Hall Green, Birmingham, by hacking down the trees that border the tracks.
What the story lacks in any gripping `action', it partly makes up with some amusing reactions to an India that can often confuse, bemuse, delight and infuriate. Benge is an enthusiastic writer, but clearly set herself an over-ambitious task.
It could be speculated that man's urge to build ever higher has, in the manner of the Tower of Babel, conspired to infuriate the heavens, who then invoke punishment upon impudent mortals below.
Each time the postal service does something to infuriate the general public, which is faily often, it encourages business to reevaluate, to look for a more dependable less expensive, and faster type of communication.
Brian curson from Leicester managed to infuriate both sets of players with his picky decisions and it was no surprise, three minutes from time, when tempers boiled over following an altercation between Chris Brandon and the penalty scorer Shane Nicholson.
But if you just give it a chance and read it, the facts alone will simply infuriate you.
THE RECENT PASSAGE of the RAVE act, which allows the government to hold event organizers responsible for customers' drug use, should infuriate even those who'd run screaming from one of these all-night, electronic-music-fueled dance parties.