infusibility


Also found in: Medical.
Related to infusibility: infeasibility

in·fus·i·ble

 (ĭn-fyo͞o′zə-bəl)
adj.
Suitable for infusion; capable of being infused.

in·fus′i·bil′i·ty, in·fus′i·ble·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Our glass and carbon fiber HighFlow products open up clear opportunities in marine, but also in other composite applications where improved and tailor-made resin infusibility constitutes a clear benefit.
According to the company, as blades are getting longer and laminates thicker, resin infusibility is becoming more critical.
Unlike ring-substituted polythiophene, the parent system stands somewhat alone among conducting polymers where its insolubility, intractability, and infusibility severely limits its use [7].
Reduction in germination parameters may be attributed to lower infusibility of water through the seed coat and initial water uptake of the seed under stress condition (Khayatnezhad and Gholamin, 2011; Bahrami, et al., 2012).
(39) This insolubility coupled with its porosity, infusibility, poor mechanical properties, and insufficient adhesion leads to difficulty in processing and application in coatings.
However, the main problem associated with the effective utilization of all the intrinsically conducting polymers, including PANI is inherent in their lower level of conductivity compared to metal, poor proc-essability, and infusibility. Hence the goal of this research is to produce hybrid materials where the inorganic components are truly dispersed at a molecular level in the organic matrix.
Annealing time depends mostly on carbon content and also on the amount of alloying elements which decrease carbon infusibility in ferrite or stabilise cementite.