infusionism

(redirected from infusionist)

infusionism

(ɪnˈfjuːʒəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Theology) Christian theol the doctrine that at the birth of each individual a pre-existing soul is implanted in his or her body, to remain there for the duration of his or her earthly life
inˈfusionist n, adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

infusionism

the doctrine or belief that the soul enters the body by divine infu-sion at conception or birth.
See also: Soul
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Aldi's new range also includes flavour-packed rums, gins and delicious pre-mixed cocktails that will look great on the Instagram grid - including the must-have shimmering Infusionist Mystical Unicorn Gin Liqueur for only PS9.99.
The new drink will join the retailer's limited-release gin ranges Greyson's and The Infusionist, which will also be bolstered with NPD for the festival.
" The National Spirits Festival at Aldi will also showcase the Infusionist Mystical Unicorn Gin Liqueur (PS9.99), Greysons Rhubarb & Bramble Gin (PS15.99) and Crossbones Dark & Golden Rums (both PS16.99).
The latest editions are all part of the retailer's wide range of flavoured gins, which now includes Infusionist Parma Violet Gin Liqueur ([pounds sterling]9.99) and Infusionist Rhubarb, Pink Grapefruit, & Black Pepper Gin Liqueur ([pounds sterling]9.99).
The gin can be bought via click and collect outlets, with details at their website, harrisdistillery.com Here's a couple more gins I'm very happy to share: Infusionist Rhubarb, Grapefruit & Black Pepper Gin Liqueur (PS9.99) is one from Aldi's range and is destined to woo you with its lush deep pink colour.
The The Infusionist Passionfruit Gin Liqueur is available in a in a 50cl bottle and contains all the flavours of a pornstar martini - a cocktail which has seen its popularity soar in recent years.
Moving across cultures and also keeping in mind the crises that Victorians were raging under, the spark can move across epistemic borders (territories of Hindu, Buddhist, and Christian religious philosophy and traditions that transgress each other with suspicion and ease) to engender what I mean by the "infusionist hunger for the other" which only language and values across cultures can establish and interrogate.
He also admitted that he was neither an infusionist nor a phlebotomist.
I find this an enormously suggestive argument, but it is one that relies on an essentially ex-centric, diffusionist model of literary history and thus one whose version of literary genealogy partially depends upon a doctrine of originality at the "center" and imitation along the "peripheries." One of the great virtues of McLaughlin's study is to complicate that imitative genealogy, not by refusing it out of hand but by suggesting that alongside (or even prior to) such a diffusionist literary history we require something like an infusionist account of the representational exchanges between metropolitan "center" and imperial "periphery." By his account, "empire" names not so much a center and its peripheries as a pericentric cultural ensemble.
Finally, The Infusionist Passion Fruit Gin Liqueur PS9.99, 50cl, Aldi, below, right) is a lush affair and the aromas are an indulgent fruit bomb of tropical fruit.