ingrateful

Related to ingrateful: Disenroll, alleviated

ingrateful

(ɪnˈɡreɪtfʊl)
adj
ungrateful
References in classic literature ?
Therefore what he gives (Whose praise be ever sung) to man in part Spiritual, may of purest Spirits be found No ingrateful food: and food alike those pure Intelligential substances require As doth your Rational; and both contain Within them every lower facultie Of sense, whereby they hear, see, smell, touch, taste, Tasting concoct, digest, assimilate, And corporeal to incorporeal turn.
(40.) Note also that, in the second half of his career, after he had come into contact with Montagine, Shakespeare repeatedly referred to the "multitude" as monstrous: "The blunt monster with uncounted heads, / The still-discordant wav'ring multitude" (2 Henry IV, Ind.17-18); "There's many a beast then in a populous city, / And many a civil monster" (Othello, 4.1.61-64); "for the multitude to be ingrateful, were to make a monster of the multitude" (Coriolanus, 2.3.10-11).
And thou, all-shaking thunder, Strike flat the thick rotundity o' th' world, Crack Nature's moulds, all germains spill at once, That makes ingrateful man!
Dry up thy marrows, vines, and plough-torn leas, Whereof ingrateful man with liquorish draughts And morsels unctuous greases his pure mind, That from it all consideration slips!
Lear invokes a thunderstorm to "Crack nature's moulds, all germens spill at once / That makes ingrateful man" (3.2.8-9).
(75.) For previous accusations in the press that John Tutchin belonged to the calves-head club, see Samuel Grascome, The Observator Observ'd: or, A Scourge For an Ingrateful Rebel ...
Ingrateful Negro-kind, dart you your rage Against the beams that warm'd you, and the stage!
When we meet Lear, alone except for the Fool, he is ignoring his companion's suffering and calling for the thunder to "singe my white head" and Strike flat the thick rotundity o' the world, Crack nature's moulds, all germens spill at once That make ingrateful man!
Is this the love, is this the recompense Of mine to thee, ingrateful Eve, expressed Immutable when thou wert lost, not I, Who might have lived and joyed immortal bliss, Yet willingly chose rather death with thee ...
However, there is no anthropomorphizing of nature in Ran--nothing like Lear's adjuration to "blow, winds, and crack your cheeks" (3.2.1) and no analogue to the "germens" Lear regards as the seeds of evil and destruction in nature that made "ingrateful man." Instead, there is a paradoxical sense that Nature is both one with and separate from human beings.
(5.) "Ingrateful Beauty Threatened," in Woudhuysen, Penguin Book of Renaissance Verse, 354-55.