ingrate

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ingrate

an ungrateful person
Not to be confused with:
ingratiate – bring oneself into favor: She ingratiated herself with the children by bringing gingerbread cookies.

in·grate

 (ĭn′grāt′)
n.
An ungrateful person.

[From Middle English ingrat, ungrateful, from Old French, from Latin ingrātus : in-, not; see in-1 + grātus, pleasing, thankful; see gwerə- in Indo-European roots.]

ingrate

(ˈɪnɡreɪt; ɪnˈɡreɪt)
n
an ungrateful person
adj
ungrateful
[C14: from Latin ingrātus (adj), from in-1 + grātus grateful]
ˈingrately adv

in•grate

(ˈɪn greɪt)

n.
1. an ungrateful person.
adj.
2. Archaic. ungrateful.
[1350–1400; Middle English ingrat < Latin ingrātus ungrateful]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ingrate - a person who shows no gratitudeingrate - a person who shows no gratitude  
unwelcome person, persona non grata - a person who for some reason is not wanted or welcome
Translations

ingrate

[ˈɪngreɪt] N (frm or iro) → ingrato/a m/f

ingrate

nundankbarer Mensch, Undankbare(r) mf (old, liter)
References in classic literature ?
I say this proudly, but with tears in my eyes -- for the firm proved themselves the basest of ingrates. The little account, about which we quarreled and finally parted, cannot, in any item, be thought overcharged, by gentlemen really conversant with the nature of the business.
This bird was a godsend to us, and I should be an ingrate if I forgot to make honorable mention of him in these pages.
I only tell you that I shall preserve for ever inscribed on my memory the service you have rendered me in order to tender you my gratitude while life shall last me; and would to Heaven love held me not so enthralled and subject to its laws and to the eyes of that fair ingrate whom I name between my teeth, but that those of this lovely damsel might be the masters of my liberty."
The wench I should have been courting now was journalism, that grisette of literature who has a smile and a hand for all beginners, welcoming them at the threshold, teaching them so much that is worth knowing, introducing them to the other lady whom they have worshipped from afar, showing them even how to woo her, and then bidding them a bright God-speed - he were an ingrate who, having had her joyous companionship, no longer flings her a kiss as they pass.
"Oh, yes, monsieur, oh, yes; and I hope to prove to you that you have not served an ingrate. But what could these men, whom I at first took for robbers, want with me, and why is Monsieur Bonacieux not here?"
"Ingrate!" continued the abbe, more and more affected.
And forgetting everything, forgetting that that forgetfulness itself compromised the princess more eloquently than his presence, "Ingrate!" said he, "and you have not even consulted me!" And he embraced him; during which time Montalais had led away Madame, and disappeared herself.
Many a time have I deferred dining several minutes that I might have the attendance of this ingrate. His efforts to reserve the window-table for me were satisfactory, and I used to allow him privileges, as to suggest dishes; I have given him information, as that someone had startled me in the reading-room by slamming a door; I have shown him how I cut my finger with a piece of string.
But why should man seek glory, who of his own Hath nothing, and to whom nothing belongs But condemnation, ignominy, and shame-- Who, for so many benefits received, Turned recreant to God, ingrate and false, And so of all true good himself despoiled; Yet, sacrilegious, to himself would take That which to God alone of right belongs?
Unwilling, even under this discomfiture, to resign the ingrate and leave her hopeless, in case of her better dispositions obtaining the mastery over the darker side of her character, Mr Meagles, for six successive days, published a discreetly covert advertisement in the morning papers, to the effect that if a certain young person who had lately left home without reflection, would at any time apply to his address at Twickenham, everything would be as it had been before, and no reproaches need be apprehended.
"Speak the truth, you ingrate!" cried Miss Havisham, passionately striking her stick upon the floor; "you are tired of me."
ingrate, he had of mee All he could have; I made him just and right, Sufficient to have stood, though free to fall.