inhabited


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in·hab·it·ed

 (ĭn-hăb′ĭ-tĭd)
adj.
Having inhabitants; lived in: a sparsely inhabited plain.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

inhabited

(ɪnˈhæbɪtɪd)
adj
lived in
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•hab•it•ed

(ɪnˈhæb ɪ tɪd)

adj.
having inhabitants.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inhabited - having inhabitants; lived in; "the inhabited regions of the earth"
uninhabited - not having inhabitants; not lived in; "an uninhabited island"; "gaping doors of uninhabited houses"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

inhabited

adjective populated, peopled, occupied, held, developed, settled, tenanted, colonized a land primarily inhabited by nomads
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
naseljen

inhabited

[ɪnˈhæbɪtɪd] ADJhabitado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

inhabited

[ɪnˈhæbɪtɪd] adj [country, island, region] → habité(e); [house] → habité(e)
a sparsely inhabited region → une région faiblement peuplée
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

inhabited

[ɪnˈhæbɪtɪd] adjabitato/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
This, too, is a matter of inquiry, whether we shall say that a city is the same while it is inhabited by the same race of men, though some of them are perpetually dying, others coming into the world, as we say that a river or a fountain is the same, though the waters are continually changing; or when a revolution takes place shall we
If this is true, it is evident, that when we speak of a city as being the same we refer to the government there established; and this, whether it is called by the same name or any other, or inhabited by the same men or different.
I ask the honorable commission, if the moon is not habitable, has she ever been inhabited, Citizen Barbicane?"
Barbicane, therefore, hastened to get in a word, and began by asking his new friend whether he thought that the moon and the planets were inhabited.
It would be difficult to find another portion of the world, of the same extent, which has so little useless land as the inhabited parts of the American Union.
The kingdom is a peninsula, terminated to the north-east by a ridge of mountains thirty miles high, which are altogether impassable, by reason of the volcanoes upon the tops: neither do the most learned know what sort of mortals inhabit beyond those mountains, or whether they be inhabited at all.
On the same day we proceeded to the palace inhabited by Lord Montbarry at the time of his last illness and death.
As the larger ground-feeding birds seldom take flight except to escape danger, I believe that the nearly wingless condition of several birds, which now inhabit or have lately inhabited several oceanic islands, tenanted by no beast of prey, has been caused by disuse.
One inhabited a deep pond, far removed from public view; the other lived in a gully containing little water, and traversed by a country road.
These men painted that hideous wilderness in charming colours, told us that we should find a country watered with navigable rivers, and inhabited by a people that would either inform us of the way, or accompany us in it.
The country was evidently habitable and inhabited. Troops of hippopotami could be seen disporting themselves in the forests of reeds, or plunging beneath the whitish waters of the lake.
The river abounded with geese and ducks, and there were signs of its being inhabited by beaver and otters: indeed they were now approaching regions where these animals, the great objects of the fur trade, are said to abound.