inhabitor

inhabitor

(ɪnˈhæbɪtə)
n
a variant form of inhabiter
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, the demand for n-Dodecyl mercaptan is increasing from the fast growing footwear industry as it is used as polymerization inhabitor in manufacturing of polyurethane and neoprene adhesives that are used in the footwear industry.
For the second year running (more like jogging) the Szecowka family, namely me and my 15-year-old son, Stan Jnr, put on the blue shirt of The Mission To Seafarers jersey -- a worthy cause for an island inhabitor as the organisation provides help and support to the 1.5 million crewmen and women who face danger every day to keep our global economy afloat.
To disclose, in short, a design and a vision which impel us to a greater apprehension of where we are situated as inhabitors of room on this globe, larger than we, and smaller than the universe."
The state of Israel was created on May 15, 1948 on the account of innocent Palestinian lives who are the original inhabitors and were forced to live in Diaspora and as refugees".
How is it that gender as a category is so easily appropriated--or, more pointedly, how is it that the dominant gender can appropriate the subordinate so easily at the level of discourse, while losing none of the power male bodies have as inhabitors of social space?
It also features UV inhabitors to keep color looking fresh.
* being depersonalized - individuals are seen as the inhabitors of roles, not as people;