inherent


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in·her·ent

 (ĭn-hîr′ənt, -hĕr′-)
adj.
Existing as an essential constituent or characteristic; intrinsic: the dangers inherent in the surgery; the inherent instability of financial markets.

[Latin inhaerēns, inhaerent-, present participle of inhaerēre, to inhere; see inhere.]

in·her′ent·ly adv.

inherent

(ɪnˈhɪərənt; -ˈhɛr-)
adj
existing as an inseparable part; intrinsic
inˈherently adv

in•her•ent

(ɪnˈhɪər ənt, -ˈhɛr-)

adj.
existing in someone or something as a permanent and inseparable element, quality, or attribute; innate.
[1570–80; < Latin]
in•her′ent•ly, adv.
syn: See essential.

inherent

  • imminent, immanent - Imminent is "about to happen" and immanent is "inherent" or "pervading the material world."
  • intrinsic - Latin intrinsecus, "on the inside," came to be the English intrinsic, "inner, internal" and "inherent."
  • proper - First meant "inherent, intrinsic."
  • innate, inherent - The word innate means "inborn" and should apply to living things; inherent is "essential, intrinsic" and applies best to nonliving things like ideas.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inherent - existing as an essential constituent or characteristic; "the Ptolemaic system with its built-in concept of periodicity"; "a constitutional inability to tell the truth"
intrinsic, intrinsical - belonging to a thing by its very nature; "form was treated as something intrinsic, as the very essence of the thing"- John Dewey
2.inherent - in the nature of something though not readily apparent; "shortcomings inherent in our approach"; "an underlying meaning"
implicit, inexplicit - implied though not directly expressed; inherent in the nature of something; "an implicit agreement not to raise the subject"; "there was implicit criticism in his voice"; "anger was implicit in the argument"; "the oak is implicit in the acorn"

inherent

inherent

adjective
Forming an essential element, as arising from the basic structure of an individual:
Translations
مُلازِم، مُتأصِّل، فِطْري
podstatnývlastnízákladní
iboende
benne rejlõ
prigimtinis
iedzimtsraksturigs
neoddeliteľný
doğuştanyapısında var olan

inherent

[ɪnˈhɪərənt] ADJinherente, intrínseco
to be inherent in or to sthser inherente a algo
with all the inherent difficultiescon todas las dificultades que conlleva

inherent

[ɪnˈhɛrənt] adj [quality] → intrinsèque
He acknowledged the firm did have inherent problems which needed to be resolved → Il a admis l'existence de problèmes inhérents à la compagnie requérant d'être résolus.
socialism's inherent weaknesses → les faiblesses inhérentes au socialisme
the inherent risks in multiple births → les risques inhérents aux naissances multiples
to be an inherent part of sth → faire partie intégrante de qch
to be inherent in sth, to be inherent to sth [dangers, risks, problems] → être inhérent(e) à qch

inherent

adjinnewohnend, eigen, inhärent (esp Philos) (→ to, in +dat); the inherent hardness of diamondsdie den Diamanten eigene Härte; instincts inherent in all animalsallen Tieren inhärente or eigene Instinkte

inherent

[ɪnˈhɪərnt] adj inherent (in)intrinseco/a (a); (kindness, cruelty) → innato/a (a)

inherent

(inˈhiərənt) adjective
inborn; forming a natural or inseparable part or quality of. the dangers inherent in nuclear energy; an inherent hatred of foreigners.
inˈherently adverb
basically. He may be mischievous, but he is not inherently wicked.

in·her·ent

a. inherente, rel. a una cualidad natural o innata.
References in classic literature ?
And you admit that every thing has a good and also an evil; as ophthalmia is the evil of the eyes and disease of the whole body; as mildew is of corn, and rot of timber, or rust of copper and iron: in everything, or in almost everything, there is an inherent evil and disease?
Biographical historians and historians of separate nations understand this force as a power inherent in heroes and rulers.
But in the great Sperm Whale, this high and mighty god-like dignity inherent in the brow is so immensely amplified, that gazing on it, in that full front view, you feel the Deity and the dread powers more forcibly than in beholding any other object in living nature.
through want of capacity, the error is inherent in the poetry.
Many workmen, it is true, paid with their lives for the rashness inherent in these dangerous labors; but these mishaps are impossible to be avoided, and they are classed among the details with which the Americans trouble themselves but little.
The natural caution that is inherent to all creatures of the wild had deserted him.
It has indeed happened, that governments of this kind have generally operated in the manner which the distinction taken notice of, supposes to be inherent in their nature; but there have been in most of them extensive exceptions to the practice, which serve to prove, as far as example will go, that there is no absolute rule on the subject.
They could undergo great privations, and were admirable for the service of the rivers, lakes, and forests, provided they could be kept sober, and in proper subordination; but once inflamed with liquor, to which they were madly addicted, all the dormant passions inherent in their nature were prone to break forth, and to hurry them into the most vindictive and bloody acts of violence.
It is so pleasing to one's 'vanity, and so safe, to be of the master's side when he assails those vices and foibles which are inherent in the system of things, and which one can contemn with vast applause so long as one does not attempt to undo the conditions they spring from.
With equal readiness will it be perceived, that besides these inducements to candor, many allowances ought to be made for the difficulties inherent in the very nature of the undertaking referred to the convention.
And firstly, if it be not entirely new, but is, as it were, a member of a state which, taken collectively, may be called composite, the changes arise chiefly from an inherent difficulty which there is in all new principalities; for men change their rulers willingly, hoping to better themselves, and this hope induces them to take up arms against him who rules: wherein they are deceived, because they afterwards find by experience they have gone from bad to worse.
Thus the stories(not by any strained effort of the narrator's, but in harmony with their inherent germ) transform themselves, and re-assume the shapes which they might be supposed to possess in the pure childhood of the world.