inhibition

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in·hi·bi·tion

 (ĭn′hə-bĭsh′ən, ĭn′ə-)
n.
1. The act of inhibiting or the state of being inhibited.
2. Something that restrains, blocks, or suppresses.
3. Psychology Conscious or unconscious restraint of a behavioral process, desire, or impulse.
4.
a. Chemistry The condition in which or the process by which a reaction is inhibited.
b. Biology The condition in which or the process by which an enzyme, for example, is inhibited.

inhibition

(ˌɪnɪˈbɪʃən; ˌɪnhɪ-)
n
1. the act of inhibiting or the condition of being inhibited
2. (Psychology) psychol
a. a mental state or condition in which the varieties of expression and behaviour of an individual become restricted
b. the weakening of a learned response usually as a result of extinction or because of the presence of a distracting stimulus
c. (in psychoanalytical theory) the unconscious restraining of an impulse. See also repression
3. (Chemistry) the process of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction
4. (Physiology) physiol the suppression of the function or action of an organ or part, as by stimulation of its nerve supply
5. (Anglicanism) Church of England an episcopal order suspending an incumbent

in•hi•bi•tion

(ˌɪn ɪˈbɪʃ ən, ˌɪn hɪ-)

n.
1. the act of inhibiting.
2. the state of being inhibited.
3. something that inhibits; constraint.
4.
a. the conscious or unconscious restraint or suppression of behavior, impulses, etc., often due to guilt or fear produced by past punishment.
b. the blocking or holding back of one psychological process by another.
5.
a. a restraining, arresting, or checking of the action of an organ or cell.
b. the reduction of a reflex or other activity as the result of an antagonistic stimulation.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin]

in·hi·bi·tion

(ĭn′hə-bĭsh′ən)
The blocking or limiting of the action of an organ, tissue, or cell of the body that is caused by the activity of certain nerves or by the release of a particular substance, such as a hormone or enzyme. Compare excitation.

inhibition

Mental blockage occurring when the superego or voice of conscience prevents the individual from behaving in a particular way.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inhibition - (psychology) the conscious exclusion of unacceptable thoughts or desires
abstinence - act or practice of refraining from indulging an appetite
psychological science, psychology - the science of mental life
2.inhibition - the quality of being inhibited
restraint, control - discipline in personal and social activities; "he was a model of polite restraint"; "she never lost control of herself"
taboo, tabu - an inhibition or ban resulting from social custom or emotional aversion
3.inhibition - (physiology) the process whereby nerves can retard or prevent the functioning of an organ or part; "the inhibition of the heart by the vagus nerve"
physiology - the branch of the biological sciences dealing with the functioning of organisms
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
4.inhibition - the action of prohibiting or inhibiting or forbidding (or an instance thereof); "they were restrained by a prohibition in their charter"; "a medical inhibition of alcoholic beverages"; "he ignored his parents' forbiddance"
action - something done (usually as opposed to something said); "there were stories of murders and other unnatural actions"

inhibition

noun
1. shyness, reserve, restraint, hang-up (informal), modesty, nervousness, reticence, self-consciousness, timidity, diffidence, bashfulness, mental blockage, timidness They behave with a total lack of inhibition.
2. obstacle, check, bar, block, barrier, restriction, hazard, restraint, hitch, drawback, snag, deterrent, obstruction, stumbling block, impediment, hindrance, encumbrance, interdict They cited security fears as a major inhibition to internet shopping.

inhibition

noun
Translations
كَبْحٌمَنْع، كَبْت
zábrana
hæmningkompleks
esto
inhibicija
gátlásszigorú tilalom
bæling
抑圧
억제
zábrana
hämning
การหักห้ามใจ
engellemeketlenme
sự ức chế

inhibition

[ˌɪnhɪˈbɪʃən] Ninhibición f
to have/have no inhibitionstener/no tener inhibiciones
to lose one's inhibitionsperder las inhibiciones

inhibition

[ˌɪnhɪˈbɪʃən ˌɪnɪˈbɪʃən] ninhibition f
to lose one's inhibitions → perdre ses inhibitions

inhibition

nHemmung f (also Psych, Sci); he has no inhibitions about speaking Frencher hat keine Hemmungen, Französisch zu sprechen; to lose one’s inhibitionsseine Hemmungen verlieren; inhibition thresholdHemmschwelle f

inhibition

[ˌɪnhɪˈbɪʃn] ninibizione f

inhibit

(inˈhibit) verb
to stop or hinder (eg someone from doing something).
inˈhibited adjective
unable to relax and express one's feelings in an open and natural way.
inhibition (iniˈbiʃən) noun

inhibition

كَبْحٌ zábrana hæmning Hemmung αναστολή inhibición esto inhibition inhibicija inibizione 抑圧 억제 remming hemning zahamowanie inibição подавленность hämning การหักห้ามใจ ketlenme sự ức chế 约束

in·hi·bi·tion

n. inhibición, interrupción o restricción de una acción o hábito.

inhibition

n inhibición f, cohibición f
References in classic literature ?
He was a very reserved man, and his natural inhibition was large in quantity and steel-like in quality.
The one drawback to Freddie Drummond was his inhibition. He never unbent.
He found himself regretting as the time drew near for him to go back to his lecture-room and his inhibition. And he often found himself waiting with anticipation for the dreamy time to pass when he could cross the Slot and cut loose and play the devil.
well, of inhibition. Freddie Drummond accepted the doctrine of evolution because it was quite universally accepted by college men, and he flatly believed that man had climbed up the ladder of life out of the weltering muck and mess of lower and monstrous organic things.
In appearance cold and reserved, aristocratic and wholesomely conservative, Catherine Van Vorst, though warm in her way, possessed an inhibition equal to Drummond's.
Then, if ever, did Freddie Drummond call upon his iron inhibition to save him.
It was not reason on his part, but inhibition which had become habit.
"There is a mental inhibition by which such symptoms can be checked and controlled," said Challenger.
Here are the front pages of the separate motions for inhibitions filed at the Supreme Court.
"My only input was in terms of the make-up." Did she harbour any inhibitions about the bold shoot?
fluorescens, where inhibitions were 57.29%, 56.89% and 55.38%, respectively.
Thiourea was used as the standard inhibitor and percentage inhibitions were calculated as follows:

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