inholder

in·hold·ing

 (ĭn′hōl′dĭng)
n.
A privately owned parcel of land within the boundaries of a federal preserve, especially within a national park or national seashore.

in′hold′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

inholder

(ˈɪnˌhəʊldə)
n
(Law) property law a person who owns or holds an inholding; the inhabitant of an inholding
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Walker later testified that he "came to dwell in Ibottsons hows called the Cross keys in Graces street" after Ibbotson's death, and he was definitely living there between July 5, 1585, and January 19, 1586, when a fishmonger named Walter Woodward claimed that "Edward Walker of Gracioustrete Inholder" had sold "fleshe victualls" on Fridays and Saturdays at his "common Inne or victualinge howse wherunto dyvers persons resorte for lodging and victualls." (66) However, Walker continued to run the Green Dragon at the same time, and would later go back to it full-time.
William Lambarde's Eirenarcha, the most frequently reprinted manual on the responsibilities of JPs, notes that Justices were to ensure that butchers and other victuallers did not sell their produce at excessive rates: 'If any Butcher, Fishmonger, Inholder, Tipler, Brewer, Baker, Powlter, or other seller of Victuall, haue not solde the same at reasonable prices, and for moderate gaines' then the commission of the peace should ensure that he loose the double of that he received'.
DINOSAUR, COLO.--As a result of an inholder allowing cattle to roam along the river at Dinosaur National Monument, willows and other wetland vegetation have been stripped bare, rare alcove bog orchids have been lost, and microbiotic crusts that prevent erosion have been crushed.
An inholder has begun bottling water from a well on private property inside Grand Teton National Park and selling it commercially.
On the far right is Chuck Cushman, founder of the National Inholder's Association, which is now the American Property Rights Association.
inholders that their land is also encumbered by monument
(267.) See Shades of Green, at 7 ("The instruments of the demise of public land rights and environmental values include the Pacific Legal Foundation, Defenders of Property Rights, American Land Rights Alliance (formerly the National Inholders Association), Center for the Defense of Free Enterprise, People for the West!, Cato Institute, and the American Legislative Exchange (ALEC).").
"There are many other inholders who would love road access to their properties," agreed park superintendent Gary Candelaria, "but there is a legal process that must be followed."
Private inholders could build homes - and even roads - that fragment the park.
Now a crowd of interests vies for attention: hunters, timber companies, inholders, environmentalists, scientists.
But as such regulations, especially those ostensibly intended to protect wetlands and endangered species, affect average property owners and business operators, hundreds of gross-roots private property organizations and inholders groups are fighting back.