inhospitably


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in·hos·pi·ta·ble

 (ĭn-hŏs′pĭ-tə-bəl, ĭn′hŏ-spĭt′ə-bəl)
adj.
1. Displaying no hospitality; unfriendly.
2. Unfavorable to life or growth; hostile: the barren, inhospitable desert.

in·hos′pi·ta·ble·ness n.
in·hos′pi·ta·bly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.inhospitably - in an inhospitable manner; "she was received inhospitably by her new family"
hospitably - in a hospitable manner; "she was received hospitably by her new family"
Translations

inhospitably

[ˌɪnhɒsˈpɪtəblɪ] ADVde modo poco hospitalario

inhospitably

advungastlich
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
"Surely it is not the custom of Englishmen to receive strangers so inhospitably."
For thus inhospitably did this fair earth, our common inheritance, present itself to the mental vision of Mr Verloc.
I had asked him the question inhospitably enough, for I resented the sort of bright and gratified recognition that still shone in his face.
But the captain inhospitably kept him perched on the lowest gang-way step, shivering miserably and with his feet dangling in the water, till we, out of very pity, rowed in from the darkness and took him off.
The game's human element makes officials susceptible to gamesmanship, such as when a catcher "frames" a pitch with his mitt to make it appear more attractive, or when a batter feigns stepping away from an offering to make it appear inhospitably inside.
common law tradition, but inhospitably in the tradition of
Other theories have included periods that would be inhospitably hot for most current lifeforms to survive.
Un comentario al margen explica: "The ancient Mariner inhospitably killeth the pious bird of good omen" (14), en referencia al disparo al ave albatros.
Regrettable though it may be that political passions would lead a whole neighborhood to act inhospitably, it is only human.
About 3.5 billion years ago, Earth's oceans were cool, not inhospitably hot as previously thought.
His Ancient Mariner inhospitably kills a pious bird for no good reason, and his Geraldine looks evil into Christabel, vulnerable because of her very hospitality; so read, she is a powerful illustration of Nussbaum's fragility of goodness.
Whence of guests he makes them slaves Inhospitably, and kills their infant males: Till, by two brethren (those two brethren call Moses and Aaron) sent from God to claim His people from enthralment, they return, With glory and spoil, back to their promised land.