inhumation


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Related to inhumation: burial

in·hume

 (ĭn-hyo͞om′)
tr.v. in·humed, in·hum·ing, in·humes
To place in a grave; bury.

[French inhumer, from Old French, from Latin inhumāre : in-, in; see in-2 + humus, earth; see dhghem- in Indo-European roots.]

in′hu·ma′tion n.
in·hum′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inhumation - the ritual placing of a corpse in a graveinhumation - the ritual placing of a corpse in a grave
funeral - a ceremony at which a dead person is buried or cremated; "hundreds of people attended his funeral"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

inhumation

noun
An act of placing a body in a grave or tomb:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

inhumation

[ˌɪnhjuːˈmeɪʃən] Ninhumación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

inhumation

n (form)Beisetzung f (form)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Le Gouverneur de Zinder, Issa Moussa s'est rendu sur les lieux de l'accident ou il a assiste a la levee des corps des victimes et a leur inhumation au cimetiere musulman de Matameye.
The archaeological record, however, reveals that burials recovered from the Forum Romanum, in the center of Rome, indicate that both cremation and inhumation were practiced concurrently there from the eighth through the sixth centuries B.C.
Tender for the inhumation. City walls shelter a house of ill fame.
12 belonged to Monte Claro layers, spread human bones, mainly long bones and several skulls--belonging to 17 individuals in the Stratum III--Bell Beaker A--, and 50 in the Stratum II--Bell Beaker B--, including a complete inhumation and grouped skulls covered by pebbles, while the rest of human remains were spread.
A Migration Period inhumation burial in Kuninguste grave contained a spearhead with a lanceolate blade (Lougas 1974, 82, plate I: 12).
All of the contributors describe the role of the state (and, in some cases, include a political view), the victims, the multiple factors involved in the exhumations (geography and topography of the murder sites, practices, and techn iques), and the identification and return of the remains to their families (or a second inhumation, with a commemorative purpose).
In forensics or anthropology, the occipital bone is frequently used in sex determination because the cranial base tends to withstand both physical insults and inhumation more successfully than many other areas of the cranium [1].
A Capacocha site has been characterized as having the following inhumation archaeological features: a) the sacrifice of one or several children of both sexes; b) burials in an important Andean mountain peak or special regional place; c) large and lavish ceramic grave goods (aribalos among others); d) fine clothes/garments (cumbi among others); e) miniature Spondylus sp., silver and gold anthropomorphic figurines decorated with exotic feathers and clothes in addition to miniature camelids made of the same type of metals; f) exotic goods such as feathers, cinnabar pigment, and Spondylus shells; g) food offerings such as chuspa bags with coca leaves and edible products (e.g., jerky, corn).