iniquitously


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Related to iniquitously: exasperated

in·iq·ui·tous

 (ĭ-nĭk′wĭ-təs)
adj.
Characterized by iniquity; wicked.

in·iq′ui·tous·ly adv.
in·iq′ui·tous·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.iniquitously - in an iniquitous manner; "they really believed that the treaty of Versailles was iniquitously injust"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

iniquitously

[ɪˈnɪkwɪtəslɪ] ADVinicuamente, injustamente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

iniquitously

[ɪˈnɪkwɪtəslɪ] adviniquamente
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
The petition concluded with stating, that the Earl, under pretence of the deeds thus iniquitously obtained, had taken possession of the whole place and living of Crossraguel, and enjoyed the profits thereof for three years.
"When you consider the place where I now was, and the company with whom I was, you will, I fancy, conceive that a very short time brought me to an end of that sum of which I had so iniquitously possessed myself.
NZNO's submission, written by senior policy analyst Marilyn Head after consultation with members, stated wages were low, work was increasingly precarious, income inequity had increased, and the benefits of increasing productivity had "largely and iniquitously accrued to capital rather than wage earners".
Whether or not, as Lorenzo believes, Boscan has been iniquitously treated by literary historians, his relationship with Garcilaso, which reveals unusual tension on his part, merits a revisionary reading that newly assesses the two poets' personal and literary partnership and, by extension, the complex social changes of the early modern period.
I was living with an iniquitously wealthy French family who owned a piano and who were very worried about the news.
Dr George Hoggan, although omitting the name of Claude Bernard, with whom he had studied in Paris, wrote in 1875 for the Morning Post that he was "of opinion that not one of those experiments on animals was justified or necessary," and that it was not advancements for "the good of humanity" which were sought, but rather "to keep up with, or get ahead of, one's contemporaries in science, even at the price of an incalculable amount of torture needlessly and iniquitously inflicted on the poor animals" (qtd.