initiator

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in·i·ti·ate

 (ĭ-nĭsh′ē-āt′)
tr.v. in·i·ti·at·ed, in·i·ti·at·ing, in·i·ti·ates
1. To set going by taking the first step; begin: initiated trade with developing nations. See Synonyms at begin.
2. To introduce to a new field, interest, skill, or activity: initiated the students into the world of opera.
3. To admit (someone) into membership, as with a ritual or ceremony.
adj. (-ĭt)
1. Initiated or admitted, as to membership or a position of authority.
2. Introduced to something new, such as a new field of knowledge.
n. (-ĭt)
1. One who is being or has been initiated into an organization.
2. One who has been introduced to or has attained some knowledge in a particular field.

[Latin initiāre, initiāt-, from initium, beginning; see ei- in Indo-European roots.]

in·i′ti·a′tor n.

initiator

(ɪˈnɪʃɪˌeɪtə)
n
1. a person or thing that initiates
2. (Chemistry) chem a substance that starts a chain reaction
3. (Chemistry) chem an explosive used in detonators
inˈitiˌatress, inˈitiˌatrix fem n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.initiator - a person who initiates a course of action
leader - a person who rules or guides or inspires others
aggressor - a confident assertive person who acts as instigator
Translations

initiator

[ɪˈnɪʃɪeɪtəʳ] Niniciador(a) m/f

initiator

[ɪˈnɪʃieɪtər] n [plan, process] → initiateur/trice m/f

initiator

nInitiator(in) m(f)

initiator

[ɪˈnɪʃɪˌeɪtəʳ] npromotore/trice
References in periodicals archive ?
Or have I been spoiled by the dozen essays making up (B)Medea,(11) four on `mythic representations' (the outsider and initiatrix, reproductive demon, foundation heroine, and illustration of sibling relationship), four on `literary portraits' (as to be seen in Pindar, Euripides, Apollonius, and Ovid), and a pair each on philosophical exploitation (a few desultory comments from John Dillon and Nussbaum on Seneca's Medea) and on oriental costume in Medea's iconography and twentieth-century stage presentations of Medea as, for example, a freedom-fighter.