injudicial


Also found in: Legal.

injudicial

(ˌɪndʒuːˈdɪʃəl)
adj
1. (Law) not fitting for a judge
2. (Law) not lawful or in line with the form of the law; not judicial
References in periodicals archive ?
Fraud examiners' reports submitted injudicial or administrative proceedings may be used by parties outside of the client, such as attorneys, defendants, plaintiffs, witnesses, juries, judges, or the media.
many used formal language common injudicial opinions to note that they
30 KVA DIESEL GENERATOR SET EXCLUSIVELY FOR SERVER ROOM INJUDICIAL ARCHIVE BUILDING OF HIGH COURT OF PUNJAB AND HARYANA AT PLOT NO.
If the representatives and senators who spend so much time using the activism of judges as a pretext for increasing the power of Congress really wanted to rein injudicial activism, Congress could simply dissolve any and all federal courts that practice judicial activism.
Law and Politics injudicial Oversight of Federal Administrative Agencies.
Courts in the United Kingdom have developed a complex jurisprudence surrounding the intensity of scrutiny to be applied when engaging injudicial review of the proportionality of executive decisions.
Advocates can take this lesson injudicial outcomes to other contexts and design more effective legislative responses to inequality.
This Part conceives of similarity's timing problem as two related but distinct splits injudicial authority: (1) whether the doctrines of merger and scenes a faire are assessed as part of copyrightability or infringement; and (2) whether the idea-expression distinction should apply at the time of creation or the time of infringement.
20) This use of the concept of social context draws on the now over two decades of work on promoting an inclusive Canadian justice system injudicial education programs involving an array of individuals (including judges, lawyers, academics, and other experts) and entities (such as the National Judicial Institute).
practice injudicial enforcement actions to confirm the jurisdictional
The shift injudicial thought to a welfare approach to assessing competitive injury in antitrust cases seems particularly inappropriate to the Robinson Patman Act.
Injudicial practice many problems are posed by the evidential standard adopted and the level of proof required.