injudicious


Also found in: Thesaurus.

in·ju·di·cious

 (ĭn′jo͞o-dĭsh′əs)
adj.
Lacking or showing a lack of judgment or discretion; unwise.

in′ju·di′cious·ly adv.
in′ju·di′cious·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

injudicious

(ˌɪndʒʊˈdɪʃəs)
adj
not discreet; imprudent
ˌinjuˈdiciously adv
ˌinjuˈdiciousness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•ju•di•cious

(ˌɪn dʒuˈdɪʃ əs)

adj.
not judicious; unwise; imprudent.
[1640–50]
in`ju•di′cious•ly, adv.
in`ju•di′cious•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.injudicious - lacking or showing lack of judgment or discretion; unwise; "an injudicious measure"; "the result of an injudicious decision"
imprudent - not prudent or wise; "very imprudent of her mother to encourage her in such silly romantic ideas"; "would be imprudent for a noneconomist to talk about the details of economic policy"- A.M.Schlesinger
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

injudicious

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

injudicious

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

injudicious

[ˌɪndʒʊˈdɪʃəs] ADJimprudente, indiscreto
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

injudicious

[ˌɪndʒʊˈdɪʃəs] adjpeu judicieux/euse
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

injudicious

adj, injudiciously
advunklug
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

injudicious

[ˌɪndʒʊˈdɪʃəs] adj (frm) → poco saggio/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Tyrrel's injudicious praises of Norah irritated his objections into openly declaring themselves.
Alexander did not insert them in his letter to Napoleon, because with his characteristic tact he felt it would be injudicious to use them at a moment when a last attempt at reconciliation was being made, but he definitely instructed Balashev to repeat them personally to Napoleon.
In reality, there are many little circumstances too often omitted by injudicious historians, from which events of the utmost importance arise.
That is just the way in this world; an enemy can partly ruin a man, but it takes a good-natured injudicious friend to complete the thing and make it perfect.
But at first, when he did not yet feel secure in his position, he knew it would affect too many interests, and would be injudicious. Later on he had been engrossed in other questions, and had simply forgotten the Board of Irrigation.
It was high testimony to my confidence in the spirit of the pale young gentleman, that I never imagined him accessory to these retaliations; they always came into my mind as the acts of injudicious relatives of his, goaded on by the state of his visage and an indignant sympathy with the family features.
The principles which had taught us to be jealous of the power of an hereditary monarch were by an injudicious excess extended to the representatives of the people in their popular assemblies.
His decision in the present instance was injudicious, and proved unfortunate.
Her fondness for her little pupil was overstrained, and I was obliged to remonstrate with her on the subject of over-indulgence and injudicious praise; but she could not gain his heart.
The ill-assorted and injudicious attire of the individual only served to render his awkwardness more conspicuous.
The Saxon, indeed, had remonstrated strongly with his friend upon the injudicious choice he had made of his party; but he had only received that sort of answer usually given by those who are more obstinate in following their own course, than strong in justifying it.
The two girls were more at a loss from being younger and in greater awe of their father, who addressed them on the occasion with rather an injudicious particularity.