inkhorn term


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inkhorn term

n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an affectedly learned and obscure borrowing from another language, esp Greek or Latin

ink′horn term`


n.
an obscure, affectedly or ostentatiously erudite borrowing from another language, esp. Latin or Greek.
[1535–45]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Other chapters uncover connections between George Puttenham's The Arte of English Poesie and sugar, Ben Jonson's Poetaster and inkhorn terms, Shakespeare's The Rape of Lucrece and the lately introduced concept of zero.
So incensed does Wilson become at this violation of decorum by his fellow-countrymen that he then composes a satirical letter attributed to an anonymous "Lincolnshire man" (163) and filled with the worst inkhorn terms imaginable.
The importance of this paper for its approach towards a statement of general validity on editorial method is somewhat concealed by the writer's convoluted expression ('a very significant non-congruency of handwritten and typeset situations' is the kernel of one knotty formulation) and by his liking for inkhorn terms.