apraxia

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a·prax·i·a

 (ā-prăk′sē-ə)
n.
Total or partial loss of the ability to perform coordinated movements or manipulate objects in the absence of motor or sensory impairment.

[Greek aprāxiā, inaction : a-, without; see a-1 + prāxis, action; see praxis.]

a·prac′tic (ā-prăk′tĭk), a·prax′ic (ā-prăk′sĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

apraxia

(əˈpræksɪə)
n
(Pathology) a disorder of the central nervous system caused by brain damage and characterized by impaired ability to carry out purposeful muscular movements
[C19: via New Latin from Greek: inactivity, from a-1 + praxis action]
aˈpraxic, aˈpractic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•prax•i•a

(əˈpræk si ə, eɪˈpræk-)

n.
a nervous disorder characterized by an inability to perform purposeful movements but not with paralysis or a loss of feeling.
[1885–90; < German Apraxie < Greek aprāxía inaction; see a-6, praxis, -ia]
a•prac′tic (-tɪk) a•prax′ic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apraxia - inability to make purposeful movementsapraxia - inability to make purposeful movements
brain disease, brain disorder, encephalopathy - any disorder or disease of the brain
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

a·prax·i·a

n. apraxia, falta de coordinación muscular en los movimientos causada por una afección cerebral.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

apraxia

n apraxia
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.