innkeeper

(redirected from innkeepers)
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inn·keep·er

 (ĭn′kē′pər)
n.
One who owns or manages an inn or hotel.

innkeeper

(ˈɪnˌkiːpə)
n
(Professions) an owner or manager of an inn

inn•keep•er

(ˈɪnˌki pər)

n.
a person who owns or manages an inn or, sometimes, a hotel.
[1540–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.innkeeper - the owner or manager of an inninnkeeper - the owner or manager of an inn  
hostess - a woman innkeeper
padrone - an owner or proprietor of an inn in Italy
patron - the proprietor of an inn
victualer, victualler - an innkeeper (especially British)

innkeeper

noun publican, hotelier, mine host, host or hostess, landlord or landlady He played the part of the innkeeper in the school nativity play.
Translations
صاحِب نُزُل أو فُنْدُق
hospodský
krovært
fogadós
gestgjafi, kráreigandi
hancımeyhaneci

innkeeper

[ˈɪnkiːpəʳ] N [of pub] → tabernero/a m/f (archaic) → posadero/a m/f, mesonero/a m/f

innkeeper

[ˈɪnkiːpər] naubergiste m/f

innkeeper

n(Gast)wirt(in) m(f)

innkeeper

[ˈɪnˌkiːpəʳ] nlocandiere/a

inn

(in) noun
1. a name given to some small hotels or public houses especially in villages or the countryside.
2. in former times, a house providing food and lodging for travellers.
ˈinnkeeper noun
a person who owned or ran such a house.
References in classic literature ?
March followed him to the bar parlor with some wonder, and his dim sense of repugnance was not dismissed by the first sight of the innkeeper, who was widely different from the genial innkeepers of romance, a bony man, very silent behind a black mustache, but with black, restless eyes.
Several inns were visited by them, several innkeepers questioned, without a single clew being given to guide their inquiries, when at Montreuil Athos felt upon the table that something rough was touching his delicate fingers.
When he had waited some days in vain, he saw the Innkeeper dressed in a new and handsome coat and sitting before his door.
On the mantelpiece was arrayed the innkeeper's collection of figured earthenware pots and stone jugs.
One of them had to go home to try on a ball-dress; for it was just the dress and the ball which had caused her to be confirmed this time, for otherwise she would not have come; the other was a poor boy, who had borrowed his coat and boots to be confirmed in from the innkeeper's son, and he was to give them back by a certain hour; the third said that he never went to a strange place if his parents were not with him--that he had always been a good boy hitherto, and would still be so now that he was confirmed, and that one ought not to laugh at him for it: the others, however, did make fun of him, after all.
"Yes, sir," answered the Innkeeper, winking in a knowing way at the Fox and the Cat, as if to say, "I understand."
At these words Alpatych nodded as if in approval, and not wishing to hear more went to the door of the room opposite the innkeeper's, where he had left his purchases.
Vincy had descended a little, having taken an innkeeper's daughter.
"There's motor-cars, right enough," the innkeeper replied, "but not many as would be fools enough to take one out.
A Coffin my Innkeeper upon landing in my first whaling port; tombstones staring at me in the whalemen's chapel; and here a gallows!
I am only afraid your honour will forget such a poor man as an innkeeper; but, if your ladyship should not, I hope you will remember what reward I refused--refused!
The tinker laid a heavy hand upon the innkeeper's fat shoulder, and tried to look impressive.