inquiline

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in·qui·line

 (ĭn′kwə-līn′, -lĭn, ĭng′-)
n.
An animal that characteristically lives commensally in the nest, burrow, or dwelling place of an animal of another species.
adj.
Being or living as an inquiline.

[Latin inquilīnus, lodger, tenant : in-, in; see in-2 + colere, to inhabit; see kwel- in Indo-European roots.]

in′qui·lin·ism (-lə-nĭz′əm), in′qui·lin′i·ty (-lĭn′ĭ-tē) n.
in′qui·lin′ous (-lī′nəs) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

inquiline

(ˈɪnkwɪˌlaɪn)
n
(Zoology) an animal that lives in close association with another animal without harming it. See also commensal1
adj
(Zoology) of or living as an inquiline
[C17: from Latin inquilīnus lodger, from in-2 + colere to dwell]
inquilinism, inquilinity n
inquilinous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•qui•line

(ˈɪn kwəˌlaɪn, -lɪn)

n.
an animal that lives in the coat, nest, burrow, etc., of another animal, usu. without harm to the host.
[1635–45; < Latin inquilīnus tenant]
in`qui•lin′i•ty (-ˈlɪn ɪ ti) n.
in`qui•li′nous (-ˈlaɪ nəs) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

inquiline

an animal that inhabits the burrow, nest, or other habitation of another animal. — inquiline, adj.
See also: Animals
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
All six lineages are highly distinct according to multiple classes of molecular markers (Helms Cahan and Keller, 2003; Anderson et al., 2006; Schwander et al., 2007), suggesting that successful invasion of colonies by the inquiline parasite may be influenced by host-parasite relatedness.
MATERIALS AND METHODS--Including data presented in this paper, there are 16 known sites that contain hosts of the inquiline parasites P.
Similar to interacting pairs of lineages, inquiline parasites cannot produce a worker caste by mating within their own lineage.