inroad


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in·road

 (ĭn′rōd′)
n.
1. An advance, especially at another's expense; an encroachment: "She had made few inroads in convincing the committee to explore the issue without prejudice" (Mary V. Dearborn).
2. A reduction or diminishment, especially by encroachment: "The inroads on free time made by television and computers have also badly affected the vitality of civil society" (Kenneth Minogue).
3. A hostile invasion; a raid.

[in + road, riding, raid (obsolete).]

inroad

(ˈɪnˌrəʊd)
n
1. an invasion or hostile attack; raid or incursion
2. an encroachment or intrusion

in•road

(ˈɪnˌroʊd)

n.
1. an advance, usu. beyond proper or established limits: Inflation is making inroads on our savings.
2. a sudden hostile incursion; raid; foray.
[1540–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inroad - an encroachment or intrusion; "they made inroads in the United States market"
usurpation, encroachment, trespass, violation, intrusion - entry to another's property without right or permission
2.inroad - an invasion or hostile attack
invasion - the act of invading; the act of an army that invades for conquest or plunder

inroad

noun
make inroads upon or into something make advances into, make forays into, make raids on, make encroachments into TV has made great inroads into cinema.

inroad

noun
An act of invading, especially by military forces:
Translations

inroad

n
(Mil) → Einfall m (→ into in +acc)
(fig) the Japanese are making inroads into the British marketdie Japaner dringen in den britischen Markt ein; these expenses are making great inroads into my bank accountdiese Ausgaben greifen mein Bankkonto stark an
References in classic literature ?
Most men would have deemed themselves fortunate to have been absent on the perilous occasion of the Sioux inroad, as was Obed Bat, (or as he was fond of hearing himself called, Battius,) M.
During Silas's absence in the daytime the door had been locked, and there had been no marks of any inroad on his return by daylight.
He had suffered severely in his family during the recent war, having had every soul to whom he was allied cut off by an inroad of the enemy; and when the last lingering remnant of his nation extinguished their fires, among the hills of the Delaware, he alone had remained, with a determination of laying his hones in that country where his fathers had so long lived and governed.
This inroad of the Fire People on the carrot-patch was the beginning of the end, though we did not know it.
A state like this would ever be exposed to the invasions of those who were powerful and inclined to attack it; but, as has been already mentioned, its situation preserves it, as it is free from the inroads of foreigners; and for this reason the family slaves still remain quiet at Crete, while the Helots are perpetually revolting: for the Cretans take no part in foreign affairs, and it is but lately that any foreign troops have made an attack upon the island; and their ravages soon proved the ineffectualness of their laws.
They were, consequently, the first dispossessed; and the seemingly inevitable fate of all these people, who disappear before the advances, or it might be termed the inroads, of civilization, as the verdure of their native forests falls before the nipping frosts, is represented as having already befallen them.
The Emperor had sent a viceroy into this province, whose firm attachment to the Roman Church, as well as great abilities in military affairs, made him a person very capable of executing the orders of the Emperor, and of suppressing any insurrection that might be raised, to prevent those alterations in religion which they were designed to promote: a farther view in the choice of so warlike a deputy was that a stop might be put to the inroads of the Galles, who had killed one viceroy, and in a little time after killed this.
Of course, in the beginning, this cannot be effected except by means of despotic inroads on the rights of property, and on the conditions of bourgeois production; by means of measures, therefore,which appear economically insufficient and untenable, but which, in the course of the movement, outstrip themselves, necessitate further inroads upon the old social order, and are unavoidable as a means of entirely revolutionising the mode of production.
After we passed this mighty nothing, called a wall, something like the Picts' walls so famous in Northumberland, built by the Romans, we began to find the country thinly inhabited, and the people rather confined to live in fortified towns, as being subject to the inroads and depredations of the Tartars, who rob in great armies, and therefore are not to be resisted by the naked inhabitants of an open country.
The want of fortifications, leaving the frontiers of one state open to another, would facilitate inroads.
The walk to the beach was no inconsiderable one, consisting as it did of a long, sandy path, upon which a sporadic and tangled growth that bordered it on either side made frequent and unexpected inroads.
My master further assured me, which I also observed myself, "that in the fields where the shining stones abound, the fiercest and most frequent battles are fought, occasioned by perpetual inroads of the neighbouring YAHOOS.