inscriptive


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in·scrip·tion

 (ĭn-skrĭp′shən)
n.
1. The act or an instance of inscribing.
2. A marking, such as the wording on a coin, medal, monument, or seal, that is inscribed.
3. A piece of material, such as a stone or metal tablet, that is inscribed.
4. An enrollment or a registration of names.
5.
a. A short, signed message in a book or on a photograph given as a gift.
b. The usually informal dedication of a book or an artistic work.

[Middle English inscripcioun, statement giving the author or title of a book, from Latin īnscrīptiō, īnscrīptiōn-, from īnscrīptus, past participle of īnscrībere, to inscribe; see inscribe.]

in·scrip′tion·al, in·scrip′tive adj.
in·scrip′tive·ly adv.

in•scrip•tive

(ɪnˈskrɪp tɪv)

adj.
of, pertaining to, or of the nature of an inscription.
[1730–40]
in•scrip′tive•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inscriptive - of or relating to an inscription
References in periodicals archive ?
These two very different kinds of places, inscriptive or matrical, occupy different kinds of space under various temporalities.
There is now a rich anthropological literature concerning various forms of inscriptive practice employed by Arrernte, Warlpiri and Western Desert peoples in Central Australia.
Both methods will have to partner with each other in English classrooms of the near future, but our students will often have surpassed their teachers in seeing morphological or inscriptive detail beyond the linguistic realm.
This direct spatialization thesis leads me to propose an incremental, or additive view of social space, in which every act of writing (but perhaps also other inscriptive and productive processes, and potentially all material culture) creates "more" social space, just as conversely, less social space results when texts are deleted or destroyed.
4) With a similar emphasis on the corporeal as an inscriptive and abstracted surface for both pain and pleasure, Salcedo's series Disremembered (2014) conjures a loosely woven and ethereal tunic seemingly occupied by an absent body.
Yet whereas neoliberalism relies upon an inscriptive mentality of 'self-discipline', it does so through the continued reliance on a sovereign subjectivity.
Intensifying the problem of reference showcased by Gentleman's Agreement--what sort of inscriptive practices are we engaging when we use words like "Jew," "Jewish," and "Jewishness"?
Johnson, whose stated aim in God's Trombones was to preserve the speech sounds and rhetorical delivery of black folk sermons, was given an inscriptive medium beyond the printed page for precisely this purpose.
If that which is remembered "is defined by the assumed identity" and "identity and memories are highly selective, inscriptive rather than descriptive, serving particular interests and ideological positions" (Gillis, 1994: 4), then the conceptualization and expression of forgetting is, just as relevant as remembrance and identity, in the choice of affiliation, retro-projection or imagination of the past (Ribeiro, 2013: 159-160).
As Robinson observed that Muslim communities had to deal with the reality of a new and powerful adversary who not only introduced changes that fundamentally affected their economic position (in case of Bengali Muslims) constantly and successively, but also eroded the inscriptive rules by which success and status were determined (Robinson, 1974).
In particular, it highlights how women's bodies became a site of intervention and an inscriptive surface "on which laws, morality, values, [and] power [were] inscribed" (Grosz 1995, 33).
1994 "The Dreaming, Human Agency and Inscriptive Practice".