insculpt

insculpt

(ɪnˈskʌlpt)
adj
engraved
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1977, for example, Kenneth Muir made the case that Shakespeare used a particular translation of a book of Latin stories for "The Merchant of Venice" based on the word "insculpt." In recent years, however, it's become rare to identify new sources for Shakespeare.
The "insculpted" coin that Morocco produces is enlisted in this argument, while the death's head that he chooses can be read as both "an emblem of time," and as "a reminder that within this new work of cultural incision, a strangely hybrid double-eyed (a Janus-like) model of cultural temporality is implicit" (46).
The Shakespearean nonce word "insculpted" proves that Shakespeare took it from Richard Robinson's Record of Auncient Histories, which was published in 1577 and 1595.