insensate

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in·sen·sate

 (ĭn-sĕn′sāt′, -sĭt)
adj.
1.
a. Lacking sensation or awareness; inanimate.
b. Unconscious.
2. Lacking sensibility; unfeeling: "a predatory, insensate society in which innocence and decency can prove fatal" (Peter S. Prescott).
3.
a. Lacking sense or the power to reason.
b. Foolish; witless.

[Latin īnsēnsātus : in-, not; see in-1 + sēnsus, understanding, reason; see sense.]

in·sen′sate′ly adv.
in·sen′sate′ness n.

insensate

(ɪnˈsɛnseɪt; -sɪt)
adj
1. lacking sensation or consciousness
2. insensitive; unfeeling
3. foolish; senseless
inˈsensately adv
inˈsensateness n

in•sen•sate

(ɪnˈsɛn seɪt, -sɪt)

adj.
1. not endowed with sensation; inanimate.
2. without feeling or sensitivity; cold; cruel.
3. without sense, understanding, or judgment; foolish.
[1510–20; < Late Latin insēnsātus irrational]
in•sen′sate•ly, adv.
in•sen′sate•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.insensate - devoid of feeling and consciousness and animation; "insentient (or insensate) stone"
2.insensate - without compunction or human feeling; "in cold blood"; "cold-blooded killing"; "insensate destruction"
inhumane - lacking and reflecting lack of pity or compassion; "humans are innately inhumane; this explains much of the misery and suffering in the world"; "biological weapons are considered too inhumane to be used"

insensate

adjective
1. Completely lacking sensation or consciousness:
2. Lacking passion and emotion:
3. Displaying a complete lack of forethought and good sense:
Translations

insensate

[ɪnˈsenseɪt] ADJ
1. (= lacking sensation) → insensato
2. (= pointless) [violence, aggression] → absurdo

insensate

adj (liter)
matter, stoneleblos, tot
(fig: = unfeeling) → gefühllos; she flew into an insensate furyein unmäßiger Zorn bemächtigte sich ihrer (liter)
References in periodicals archive ?
What we consider sensing and sense data as opposed to insensateness and noise is shaped and reshaped at moments of crisis, and, indeed, the whole sensorium is subject to historical-critical forces.