insessorial

in·ses·so·ri·al

 (ĭn′sĕ-sôr′ē-əl)
adj.
Perching or adapted for perching: insessorial claws.

[From New Latin Īnsessōrēs, the perchers (former order name), from Latin īnsessus, past participle of īnsidēre, to sit upon; see insidious.]

insessorial

(ˌɪnsɛˈsɔːrɪəl)
adj
1. (Zoology) (of feet or claws) adapted for perching
2. (Zoology) (of birds) having insessorial feet
[C19: from New Latin Insessōrēs birds that perch, from Latin: perchers, from insidēre to sit upon, from sedēre to sit]
References in periodicals archive ?
If a bird has insessorial feet, what is it adapted to do?
Specifically, volume 2 of "Go Up to the Hilltops" chronicles the years of the Russo-Japanese War (1905) and the subsequent turbulence in czarist Russia, World War I, and the concomitant prelude to Estonia's independence - all seen against the backdrop of the generational clash between Burnt Hill's insessorial old and autophagous young people.