insignificant

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in·sig·nif·i·cant

 (ĭn′sĭg-nĭf′ĭ-kənt)
adj.
1. Not significant, especially:
a. Lacking in importance; trivial.
b. Lacking power, position, or value; worthy of little regard.
c. Small in size or amount.
2. Having little or no meaning.

in′sig·nif′i·cant·ly adv.

insignificant

(ˌɪnsɪɡˈnɪfɪkənt)
adj
1. having little or no importance; trifling
2. almost or relatively meaningless
3. small or inadequate: an insignificant wage.
4. not distinctive in character, etc
ˌinsigˈnificance, ˌinsigˈnificancy n
ˌinsigˈnificantly adv

in•sig•nif•i•cant

(ˌɪn sɪgˈnɪf ɪ kənt)

adj.
1. unimportant, trifling, or petty.
2. too small to be important: an insignificant sum.
3. without weight, influence, or distinctione: an insignificant fellow.
4. without meaning; meaningless.
[1620–30]
in`sig•nif′i•cant•ly, adv.

insignificant

  • piff - Something insignificant.
  • bee's knees - Used from 1797 for "something insignificant."
  • floccinaucinihilipilification, floccipend - Floccinaucinihilipilification is estimating or categorizing something as worthless, and floccipend means "regard as insignificant" (from Latin flocci pendere, "hold at little value").
  • piteous, pitiable, pitiful - Piteous is generally not used when speaking of people, pitiable means "able to be pitied," and pitiful most often means "insignificant; below contempt."
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.insignificant - not worthy of notice
unnoticeable - not noticeable; not drawing attention; "her clothes were simple and unnoticeable"- J.G.Cozzens
2.insignificant - signifying nothing; "insignificant sounds"
meaningless, nonmeaningful - having no meaning or direction or purpose; "a meaningless endeavor"; "a meaningless life"; "a verbose but meaningless explanation"
3.insignificant - of little importance or influence or power; of minor status; "a minor, insignificant bureaucrat"; "peanut politicians"
minor - of lesser importance or stature or rank; "a minor poet"; "had a minor part in the play"; "a minor official"; "many of these hardy adventurers were minor noblemen"; "minor back roads"
4.insignificant - devoid of importance, meaning, or force
unimportant - not important; "a relatively unimportant feature of the system"; "the question seems unimportant"
meaningless, nonmeaningful - having no meaning or direction or purpose; "a meaningless endeavor"; "a meaningless life"; "a verbose but meaningless explanation"
significant, important - important in effect or meaning; "a significant change in tax laws"; "a significant change in the Constitution"; "a significant contribution"; "significant details"; "statistically significant"

insignificant

insignificant

adjective
Translations
تافِه، عَديم الأهميَّه
bezvýznamnýnepatrný
betydningsløsubetydelig
lítilfjörlegur
nereikšmingumas
mazsvarīgsnenozīmīgs
nepomembenneznaten

insignificant

[ˌɪnsɪgˈnɪfɪkənt] ADJ [person, number, amount] → insignificante; [detail] → insignificante, sin importancia
who left it here is insignificant, the important thing isno tiene importancia quién lo dejó aquí, lo importante es ...

insignificant

[ˌɪnsɪgˈnɪfɪkənt] adjinsignifiant(e)

insignificant

adjunbedeutend; sum also, wound, alterationgeringfügig; little man, person, appearanceunscheinbar; (= inconsequential) remarkbelanglos; her not insignificant talentsihre nicht unbeträchtlichen Talente; statistically insignificantstatistisch vernachlässigbar

insignificant

[ˌɪnsɪgˈnɪfɪkənt] adjinsignificante

insignificant

(insigˈnifikənt) adjective
of little value or importance; not significant. They paid me an insignificant sum of money; an insignificant person.
ˌinsigˈnificance noun

insignificant

a. insignificante, sin importancia.
References in classic literature ?
To those who live in the narrow circle of human interests and human feelings, there ever exists, unheeded, almost unnoticed, before their very eyes, the most humbling proofs of their own comparative insignificance in the scale of creation, which, in the midst of their admitted mastery over the earth and all it contains, it would be well for them to consider, if they would obtain just views of what they are and what they were intended to be.
He was a tall, big man, but he seemed to shrink into insignificance.
Let England have its navigation and fleet -- let Scotland have its navigation and fleet -- let Wales have its navigation and fleet -- let Ireland have its navigation and fleet -- let those four of the constituent parts of the British empire be be under four independent governments, and it is easy to perceive how soon they would each dwindle into comparative insignificance.