insinuation

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in·sin·u·a·tion

 (ĭn-sĭn′yo͞o-ā′shən)
n.
1. The act, process, or practice of insinuating.
2. Something insinuated, especially an artfully indirect, often derogatory suggestion.

insinuation

(ɪnˌsɪnjʊˈeɪʃən)
n
1. an indirect or devious hint or suggestion
2. the act or practice of insinuating

in•sin•u•a•tion

(ɪnˌsɪn yuˈeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an indirect or covert suggestion or hint, esp. of a derogatory nature.
2. the art or power of stealing into the affections and pleasing; ingratiation.
3. an act or instance of insinuating.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.insinuation - an indirect (and usually malicious) implication
implication - an accusation that brings into intimate and usually incriminating connection
2.insinuation - the act of gaining acceptance or affection for yourself by persuasive and subtle blandishments; "she refused to use insinuation in order to gain favor"
wheedling, blandishment - the act of urging by means of teasing or flattery

insinuation

noun implication, suggestion, hint, allusion, innuendo It isn't right to bring a good man down by rumour and insinuation.

insinuation

noun
An artful, indirect, often derogatory hint:
Translations

insinuation

[ɪnˌsɪnjʊˈeɪʃən] N
1. (= hint) → insinuación f
he made certain insinuationshizo algunas insinuaciones
2. (= act) → introducción f

insinuation

[ɪnˌsɪnjuˈeɪʃən] ninsinuation f

insinuation

nAnspielung f (→ about auf +acc); he objected strongly to any insinuation that …er wehrte sich heftig gegen jede Andeutung, dass …

insinuation

[ɪnˌsɪnjʊˈeɪʃn] ninsinuazione f
References in classic literature ?
In the light of Claire's insinuations what had seemed coincidences took on a more sinister character.
After listening to her insinuations about his physical soundness, Cutter would resume his dumb-bell practice for a month, or rise daily at the hour when his wife most liked to sleep, dress noisily, and drive out to the track with his trotting-horse.
To these insinuations Barbicane returned no answer; perhaps he never heard of them, so absorbed was he in the calculations for his great enterprise.
She gave her an answer which marked her contempt, and instantly left the room, resolving that, whatever might be the inconvenience or expense of so sudden a removal, her beloved Elinor should not be exposed another week to such insinuations.
I do not like to make insinuations, but I do think the above statistics darkly suggest that these people over here drink this detestable water "on the sly.
You have not every reason to say so of the rest of his people," said Estella, nodding at me with an expression of face that was at once grave and rallying, "for they beset Miss Havisham with reports and insinuations to your disadvantage.
Sir," said he to Danglars, "understand that I do not take a final leave of you; I must ascertain if your insinuations are just, and am going now to inquire of the Count of Monte Cristo.
She had never found it so difficult to listen to him, though nothing could exceed his solicitude and care, and though his subjects were principally such as were wont to be always interesting: praise, warm, just, and discriminating, of Lady Russell, and insinuations highly rational against Mrs Clay.
always to [1315a] seem particularly attentive to the worship of the gods; for from persons of such a character men entertain less fears of suffering anything illegal while they suppose that he who governs them is religious and reverences the gods; and they will be less inclined to raise insinuations against such a one, as being peculiarly under their protection: but this must be so done as to give no occasion for any suspicion of hypocrisy.
And he rewards her by such smiles and glances, such whispered words, or boldly-spoken insinuations, indicative of his sense of her goodness and my neglect, as make the blood rush into my face, in spite of myself - for I would be utterly regardless of it all - deaf and blind to everything that passes between them, since the more I show myself sensible of their wickedness the more she triumphs in her victory, and the more he flatters himself that I love him devotedly still, in spite of my pretended indifference.
He could see that she was vastly impressed by this vague talk, so he endorsed his pose by random insinuations concerning great wealth, and mentioned familiarly a few names that are handled reverently by the proletariat.
My dear Muriel," she said, "I think that you are wrong to make such insinuations.