insipid


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in·sip·id

 (ĭn-sĭp′ĭd)
adj.
1. Lacking flavor or zest; not tasty: insipid soup.
2. Lacking qualities that excite, stimulate, or interest; dull.

[French insipide, from Late Latin īnsipidus : Latin in-, not; see in-1 + Latin sapidus, savory (from sapere, to taste; see sep- in Indo-European roots).]

in′si·pid′i·ty (ĭn′sĭ-pĭd′ĭ-tē), in·sip′id·ness n.
in·sip′id·ly adv.

insipid

(ɪnˈsɪpɪd)
adj
1. lacking spirit; boring
2. lacking taste; unpalatable
[C17: from Latin insipidus, from in-1 + sapidus full of flavour, sapid]
ˌinsiˈpidity, inˈsipidness n
inˈsipidly adv

in•sip•id

(ɪnˈsɪp ɪd)

adj.
1. without distinctive, interesting, or stimulating qualities; vapid: an insipid personality.
2. without sufficient taste to be pleasing, as food or drink; bland: a rather insipid soup.
[1610–20; < Late Latin insipidus= Latin in- in-3 + -sipidus, comb. form of sapidus tasty; see sage1]
in`si•pid′i•ty, in•sip′id•ness, n.
in•sip′id•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.insipid - lacking taste or flavor or tanginsipid - lacking taste or flavor or tang; "a bland diet"; "insipid hospital food"; "flavorless supermarket tomatoes"; "vapid beer"; "vapid tea"
tasteless - lacking flavor
2.insipid - lacking interest or significance or impact; "an insipid personality"; "jejune novel"
uninteresting - arousing no interest or attention or curiosity or excitement; "a very uninteresting account of her trip"

insipid

adjective
1. tasteless, bland, flavourless, watered down, watery, wishy-washy (informal), unappetizing, savourless It tasted bland and insipid, like warm cardboard.
tasteless tasty, savoury, pungent, fiery, palatable, piquant, appetizing
2. bland, boring, dull, flat, dry, weak, stupid, limp, tame, pointless, tedious, stale, drab, banal, tiresome, lifeless, prosaic, trite, unimaginative, colourless, uninteresting, anaemic, wishy-washy (informal), ho-hum (informal), vapid, wearisome, characterless, spiritless, jejune, prosy On the surface she seemed meek, rather bland and insipid. They gave an insipid opening performance in a nil-nil draw.
bland interesting, exciting, stimulating, spirited, engaging, lively, colourful, provocative

insipid

adjective
1. Lacking an appetizing flavor:
2. Lacking the qualities requisite for spiritedness and originality:
Informal: wishy-washy.
Translations
mielenkiinnotonvalju

insipid

[ɪnˈsɪpɪd] ADJinsípido, soso

insipid

[ɪnˈsɪpɪd] adj
[taste, colour] → insipide
[person] → insipide

insipid

adjfade; colourlangweilig; (= vapid) person, novel, lyricsgeistlos

insipid

[ɪnˈsɪpɪd] adj (food, drink) → insipido/a (fig) → insulso/a, insipido/a

insipid

a. insípido-a, sin sabor;
pop. soso-a.
References in classic literature ?
Beware my Laura (she would often say) Beware of the insipid Vanities and idle Dissipations of the Metropolis of England; Beware of the unmeaning Luxuries of Bath and of the stinking fish of Southampton.
He is quite agreeable enough, however, to afford me amusement, and to make many of those hours pass very pleasantly which would otherwise be spent in endeavouring to overcome my sister-in-law's reserve, and listening to the insipid talk of her husband.
But in Europe everywhere except in the mountains, the water is flat and insipid beyond the power of words to describe.
We are on a perilous margin when we begin to look passively at our future selves, and see our own figures led with dull consent into insipid misdoing and shabby achievement.
She was not of so ungovernable a temper as Lydia; and, removed from the influence of Lydia's example, she became, by proper attention and management, less irritable, less ignorant, and less insipid.
Yes, novels; for I will not adopt that ungenerous and impolitic custom so common with novel-writers, of degrading by their contemptuous censure the very performances, to the number of which they are themselves adding -- joining with their greatest enemies in bestowing the harshest epithets on such works, and scarcely ever permitting them to be read by their own heroine, who, if she accidentally take up a novel, is sure to turn over its insipid pages with disgust.
When Simon Nishikanta, huge and gross as in the flesh he was and for ever painting delicate, insipid, feministic water- colours, when he threw his deck-chair at Scraps for clumsily knocking over his easel, he found the ham-like hand of Grimshaw so instant and heavy on his shoulder as to whirl him half about, almost fling him to the deck, and leave him lame-muscled and black-and-blued for days.
His cheeks were very white, and something like a scowl was blackening his heavy, insipid face.
He had to eat with a knife and fork; he had to use napkin, cup, and plate; he had to learn his book, he had to go to church; he had to talk so properly that speech was become insipid in his mouth; whitherso- ever he turned, the bars and shackles of civilization shut him in and bound him hand and foot.
This sensation of listlessness, weariness, stupidity, this disinclination to sit down and employ myself, this feeling of every thing's being dull and insipid about the house
You decide on his imperfections so much in the mass," replied Elinor, "and so much on the strength of your own imagination, that the commendation I am able to give of him is comparatively cold and insipid.
It was at first a very insipid diet, though common enough in many parts of Europe, but grew tolerable by time; and having been often reduced to hard fare in my life, this was not the first experiment I had made how easily nature is satisfied.