insolent


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Related to insolent: impertinent

in·so·lent

 (ĭn′sə-lənt)
adj.
1. Audaciously rude or disrespectful; impertinent or impudent.
2. Archaic Presumptuous and insulting in manner or speech; arrogant.

[Middle English, from Latin īnsolēns, īnsolent-, immoderate, arrogant : in-, not; see in-1 + solēns, present participle of solēre, to be accustomed.]

in′so·lence (-ləns) n.
in′so·lent·ly adv.

insolent

(ˈɪnsələnt)
adj
offensive, impudent, or disrespectful
[C14: from Latin insolens, from in-1 + solēre to be accustomed]
ˈinsolence n
ˈinsolently adv

in•so•lent

(ˈɪn sə lənt)

adj.
1. boldly rude or disrespectful; contemptuously impertinent.
n.
2. an insolent person.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin insolēns unaccustomed, immoderate, haughty =in- in-3 + solēns, present participle of solēre to be accustomed]
in′so•lence, n.
in′so•lent•ly, adv.
syn: See impertinent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.insolent - marked by casual disrespect; "a flip answer to serious question"; "the student was kept in for impudent behavior"
disrespectful - exhibiting lack of respect; rude and discourteous; "remarks disrespectful of the law"; "disrespectful in the presence of his parents"; "disrespectful toward his teacher"
2.insolent - unrestrained by convention or proprietyinsolent - unrestrained by convention or propriety; "an audacious trick to pull"; "a barefaced hypocrite"; "the most bodacious display of tourism this side of Anaheim"- Los Angeles Times; "bald-faced lies"; "brazen arrogance"; "the modern world with its quick material successes and insolent belief in the boundless possibilities of progress"- Bertrand Russell
unashamed - used of persons or their behavior; feeling no shame

insolent

insolent

adjective
Translations
وَقِح، مُهين
drzý
uforskammet
ósvífinn
užgaulumas
apvainojošsnekaunīgs
predrzen

insolent

[ˈɪnsələnt] ADJinsolente

insolent

[ˈɪnsələnt] adjinsolent(e)
to be insolent to sb → se montrer insolent(e) envers qn

insolent

adj, insolently

insolent

[ˈɪnslənt] adjinsolente

insolent

(ˈinsələnt) adjective
(of a person or his behaviour) insulting or offensive. an insolent stare/remark.
ˈinsolently adverb
ˈinsolence noun
References in classic literature ?
he cried; "how dare you look at me in that insolent way.
Anna Pavlovna whispered the next words in advance, like an old woman muttering the prayer at Communion: "Let the bold and insolent Goliath.
The ignorant English mind (I have observed) is apt to be insolent in the exercise of unrestrained English liberty.
Hammerfield's judgment of Ernest, which was to the effect that he was "an insolent young puppy, made bumptious by a little and very inadequate learning.
thou remindest me, too, that I have a debt to pay to that insolent peasant who yesterday insulted our person.
His insolent bravery, his still more insolent success at a time when blows poured down like hail, had borne him to the top of that difficult ladder called Court Favor, which he had climbed four steps at a time.
There is exquisite pleasure in subduing an insolent spirit, in making a person predetermined to dislike acknowledge one's superiority.
It is true that in government, it is good to use men of one rank equally: for to countenance some extraordinarily, is to make them insolent, and the rest discontent; because they may claim a due.
Let us suppose an inhabitant of some remote and superior region, yet unskilled in the ways of men, having read and considered the precepts of the gospel, and the example of our Saviour, to come down in search of the true church: if he would not inquire after it among the cruel, the insolent, and the oppressive; among those who are continually grasping at dominion over souls as well as bodies; among those who are employed in procuring to themselves impunity for the most enormous villainies, and studying methods of destroying their fellow-creatures, not for their crimes but their errors; if he would not expect to meet benevolence, engage in massacres, or to find mercy in a court of inquisition, he would not look for the true church in the Church of Rome.
Or if you like you can keep him here at the station, and I will send him clothes and food that he may be no burden on you and on your men; but I will not have him go near the suitors, for they are very insolent, and are sure to ill treat him in a way that would greatly grieve me; no matter how valiant a man may be he can do nothing against numbers, for they will be too strong for him.
His coming into the country at all is a most insolent thing, indeed, and I wonder how he could presume to do it.
Upon this they were all trooping away, with every man a gun, a pistol, and a sword, and muttered some insolent things among themselves of what they would do to the Spaniards, too, when opportunity offered; but the Spaniards, it seems, did not so perfectly understand them as to know all the particulars, only that in general they threatened them hard for taking the two Englishmen's part.