insouciant

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Related to insouciantly: tactless

in·sou·ci·ant

 (ĭn-so͞o′sē-ənt, ăN′so͞o-syäN′)
adj.
Marked by blithe unconcern; nonchalant.

[French : in-, not (from Old French; see in-1) + souciant, present participle of soucier, to trouble (from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *sollicītāre, alteration of Latin sollicitāre, to vex; see solicit).]

in·sou′ci·ant·ly adv.

insouciant

(ɪnˈsuːsɪənt)
adj
carefree or unconcerned; light-hearted
[C19: from French, from in-1 + souciant worrying, from soucier to trouble, from Latin sollicitāre; compare solicitous]
inˈsouciance n
inˈsouciantly adv

in•sou•ci•ant

(ɪnˈsu si ənt; Fr. ɛ̃ suˈsyɑ̃)

adj.
free from concern, worry, or anxiety; carefree; nonchalant.
[1820–30; < French, =in- in-3 + souciant, present participle of soucier to worry < Vulgar Latin *sollicītāre, for Latin sollicitāre to disturb; see solicit]
in•sou′ci•ant•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.insouciant - marked by blithe unconcerninsouciant - marked by blithe unconcern; "an ability to interest casual students"; "showed a casual disregard for cold weather"; "an utterly insouciant financial policy"; "an elegantly insouciant manner"; "drove his car with nonchalant abandon"; "was polite in a teasing nonchalant manner"
unconcerned - lacking in interest or care or feeling; "the average American...is unconcerned that his or her plight is the result of a complex of personal and economic and governmental actions...beyond the normal citizen's comprehension and control"; "blithely unconcerned about his friend's plight"

insouciant

adjective nonchalant, casual, carefree, gay, sunny, buoyant, airy, breezy, unconcerned, jaunty, untroubled, happy-go-lucky, free and easy, unworried, light-hearted He worked with insouciant disregard for convention.
Translations

insouciant

[ɪnˈsuːsɪənt] ADJdespreocupado

insouciant

[ɪnˈsuːsiənt] (formal) adj (= nonchalant) → insouciant(e)

insouciant

adj (liter: = careless) → unbekümmert; to be insouciant about somethingsich nicht um etw kümmern

insouciant

[ɪnˈsuːsɪənt] adj (liter) → noncurante
References in periodicals archive ?
Less subtle, perhaps, is the sledgehammer on which he insouciantly leans; while his expression is unconcerned, he looks as ready to wield his weapon as was some grim-faced eighteenth-century colonel with his halberd in a Joshua Reynolds painting.
Despite this stylistic variety and the artist's method of juxtaposing sharply contrasting elements and phenomena, one never feels that Wallin's main interest lies in working with allusions; his films are merely the fruit of a singular eclecticism that insouciantly samples a wide range of sources and pushes them to extremes.
By a very old man." Somehow these slight-seeming knockoffs got to the nub of any debates about mind, perception, process, and product as insouciantly as his I Remember poems--"I remember the sound of the ice cream man coming"--put to rest the pretension that had accrued to the mini-epics of memory of the romantics, while refreshing the formula.
Pelevin proceeds insouciantly, absolutely unabashed about either the humanity, or the insectness, of his characters.
The part calls for a silky grifter who can flip a Matisse as insouciantly as an omelette, but Sutherland seems to be playing Santa in a made-for-TV version of Miracle on 34th Street.
Even when the structuring approaches symmetry, it is insouciantly interrupted by the inexplicable.
I glanced across the river, to the opposite bank, where a huge, sandy coloured croc lay basking in the early morning sun, flicking its tail insouciantly as it snoozed.
The andante flowed at an ideal pace, the minuet bounced along insouciantly and Mozart would have been delighted that his request for the presto to be played "as fast as possible" was delivered - and with precise articulation.
(That explains why we behave so insouciantly with our unearned windfall.)
Cameron insouciantly assumed that the result would discredit Boris Johnson, potential challenger for PM at the head of the Eurosceptic faction.
The unflappable Luke makes an impression on his fellow prisoners; his nickname is sourced from a justification he gives for making a winning bluff in one of the jail's nightly poker games: 'Sometimes nothin' can be a real cool hand.' Luke wears prison life with a wry smile, which insouciantly suggests that he is in on a private joke that nobody else is privy to.
And it's exhilarating, like when one triumphant Jaeger gazes down at a downed opponent after a climactic fight and insouciantly lifts its middle fingers.