inspector general

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inspector general

n. pl. inspectors general Abbr. IG
An officer with general investigative powers within a civil, military, or other organization.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

inspector general

n, pl inspectors general
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the head of an inspectorate or inspection system; an officer with wide investigative powers
2. (Military) a staff officer of the military, air, or naval service with the responsibility of conducting inspections and investigations
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inspector general - a military officer responsible for investigationsinspector general - a military officer responsible for investigations
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
military officer, officer - any person in the armed services who holds a position of authority or command; "an officer is responsible for the lives of his men"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
IG, NHMP AD Khowaja, Additional Inspectors General Kahlid Mehmood and Abbas Hussain Malik, DIG operation Jam Muhammad, Zonal Commanders, Ishfaq Ahmed, Alam Khan Shenwari, AIG syed Hashmat Kamal, AIG Irum Abbasi and AIG Jameil Ahmed Hasmi and large number of officials of Motorway Police were there to pay the honour to the DIG Riffat Mukhtar Raja and DIG Muhammad Saleem..
He led the Intelligence Community Inspectors General Forum, which included all 17 Inspectors General that make up the Intelligence Community.
The ballot initiative suggests creating an advisory board to appoint future inspectors general. The measure would also provide that office with subpoena and investigatory powers itcurrently lacks.<br />"It's about (the inspector general) having clear, stable funding, a strong model and the power they need to pursue issues of fraud and malfeasance," said Marceline White, executive director of the Maryland Consumer Rights Coalition, a member of BCAT.<br />Councilman Ryan Dorsey introduced legislation to the City Council in March that mirrors the proposal for which advocates are collecting signatures.
The 4th one-day Retired Inspectors General of Police conference was held on Saturday in Islamabad, hosted by Association of Former Inspectors General of Police (AFIGP).
Horowitz said the 72-member Council of Inspectors General that he leads is "in complete agreement" that their access to information "must be absolute." Beyond potentially hindering investigations, he said the watchdogs worry that the legal opinion could have a chilling effect on potential whistleblowers and rank-and-file government workers trying to do their jobs.
The turf battle between the two offices is the latest under the Obama administration to question the effective independence of the government's inspectors general, which are also political appointments but are expected to work outside any political influence.
Inspectors General represent one more strategy in a significant national effort to gain greater oversight and accountability over governmental agencies and operations.
In addition, we continued to participate in the activities of the broader Inspector General community, including the Council of Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency and the Legislative Branch Inspectors General quarterly meetings.
A recent review by the Council of Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency found that the Afghanistan's inspector general's office did not meet professional standards for investigators and found multiple serious deficiencies in the audit division.
Typically the only federal government watchdogs that raise eyebrows at covert propaganda are inspectors general and the Government Accountability Office, both of which can spring into action only at the request of a member of Congress.
The inspectors general are appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate, report directly to the head of their host department and agency, and keep Congress and their agency head fully informed of any problems and deficiencies found in program delivery.