inspector general

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inspector general

n. pl. inspectors general Abbr. IG
An officer with general investigative powers within a civil, military, or other organization.

inspector general

n, pl inspectors general
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the head of an inspectorate or inspection system; an officer with wide investigative powers
2. (Military) a staff officer of the military, air, or naval service with the responsibility of conducting inspections and investigations
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inspector general - a military officer responsible for investigationsinspector general - a military officer responsible for investigations
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
military officer, officer - any person in the armed services who holds a position of authority or command; "an officer is responsible for the lives of his men"
References in periodicals archive ?
the Northwest Florida Water Management District must employ an Inspector General who must have the qualifications prescribed and perform the applicable services of state agency inspectors general as provided in s.
Horowitz said the 72-member Council of Inspectors General that he leads is "in complete agreement" that their access to information "must be absolute.
The turf battle between the two offices is the latest under the Obama administration to question the effective independence of the government's inspectors general, which are also political appointments but are expected to work outside any political influence.
Inspectors General represent one more strategy in a significant national effort to gain greater oversight and accountability over governmental agencies and operations.
In addition, we continued to participate in the activities of the broader Inspector General community, including the Council of Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency and the Legislative Branch Inspectors General quarterly meetings.
A recent review by the Council of Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency found that the Afghanistan's inspector general's office did not meet professional standards for investigators and found multiple serious deficiencies in the audit division.
Typically the only federal government watchdogs that raise eyebrows at covert propaganda are inspectors general and the Government Accountability Office, both of which can spring into action only at the request of a member of Congress.
The inspectors general are appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate, report directly to the head of their host department and agency, and keep Congress and their agency head fully informed of any problems and deficiencies found in program delivery.
True enough, inspectors general, being career bureaucrats, tend to whisper rather than shout and characteristically favor oblique phrases over acute ones.
The new legislation limits the Inspectors General (IGs) of the Board and of the Treasury in a way that other IGs are not affected.
Inspectors General conduct oversight over federal agencies and work to identify waste, fraud, and abuse.