insularity


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in·su·lar

 (ĭn′sə-lər, ĭns′yə-)
adj.
1.
a. Of, relating to, or constituting an island.
b. Living or located on an island.
2.
a. Suggestive of the isolated life of an island: "He is an exceedingly insular man, so deeply private as to seem inaccessible to the scrutiny of a novelist" (Leonard Michaels).
b. Circumscribed and detached in outlook and experience; narrow or provincial.
3. Anatomy Of or relating to isolated tissue or an island of tissue.

[French insulaire, from Late Latin īnsulāris, from Latin īnsula, island.]

in′su·lar·ism, in′su·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.
in′su·lar·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.insularity - the state of being isolated or detached; "the insulation of England was preserved by the English Channel"
isolation - a state of separation between persons or groups
Translations

insularity

[ˌɪnsjʊˈlærɪtɪ] Ninsularidad f (fig) → estrechez f de miras

insularity

[ˌɪnsjʊˈlærɪti] n (= narrow-mindedness) [person, community] → esprit m de clocher
They have started to break out of their old insularity → Ils ont commencé à se départir de leur vieil esprit de clocher.

insularity

n (= narrow-mindedness)Engstirnigkeit f
References in classic literature ?
Hers was that common insularity of mind that makes human creatures believe that their color, creed, and politics are best and right and that other human creatures scattered over the world are less fortunately placed than they.
His point of view is unusually broad, his chief general purpose being to free English taste from its insularity, to give it sympathetic acquaintance with the peculiar excellences of other literatures.
who condemned our democratic decision as the ultimate act of insularity.
Given the insularity, the geography, specific typology, and location, most islands face numerous challenges such as high energy costs, concerns relating to Security of Supply, small economies of scale, in many cases reliance on imported fossil fuels, and limited or lack of connection with mainland Europe.
The indie-bookseller coalition points to the problem of US readers' insularity, and suggests "the answer lies in empowering one of our of greatest cultural assets: independent bookstores and the booksellers that run them.
If Russell has, somehow, been excessively victimised, the fault lies with his and horse racing's insularity not with those looking on from the outside who happened to take offence at the sight of a man bashing his fist into a horse's head.
Summary: Far from holding Africa back, the drive towards insularity in the developed world could actually help to accelerate economic growth on the continent.
Drawing from personal experience, he provides deep theoretical insight into the all-too-familiar radical tendency toward self-defeating insularity and paralyzing purism.
They look beyond established paradigms by examining the relationship between the writing of Jewish and non-Jewish histories in eastern Europe, adding to a growing literature that seeks to transcend the trope of Jewish cultural insularity.
A relatively small change thanks, once again, to the dollar's privileged insularity.
I believe that recent Government modern language education policy where studying a language is optional has contributed to a suspicion of "foreigners" and has helped to create an unhealthy climate of insularity and xenophobia.
The history that emerges reveals how decades of urban planning, suburbanization, and privatization have eroded an open, tolerant society and given rise to the insularity, xenophobia, and divisiveness that characterize Kuwaiti social relations today.