insurgent

(redirected from insurgencies)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

in·sur·gent

 (ĭn-sûr′jənt)
adj.
1. Rising in revolt against a government or other established authority.
2. Rebelling against the leadership of a political party.
n.
One who is insurgent.

[Latin īnsurgēns, īnsurgent-, present participle of īnsurgere, to rise up : in-, intensive pref.; see in-2 + surgere, to rise; see surge.]

in·sur′gent·ly adv.

insurgent

(ɪnˈsɜːdʒənt)
adj
rebellious or in revolt, as against a government in power or the civil authorities
n
1. a person who takes part in an uprising or rebellion; insurrectionist
2. (Law) international law a person or group that rises in revolt against an established government or authority but whose conduct does not amount to belligerency
[C18: from Latin insurgēns rising upon or against, from insurgere to rise up, from surgere to rise]
inˈsurgency n

in•sur•gent

(ɪnˈsɜr dʒənt)

n.
1. a person who takes part in forcible opposition or armed resistance to an established government or authority; rebel.
2. a member of a group, esp. a political party, who revolts against the policies of the leadership.
adj.
3. rising in revolt; rebellious.
[1755–65; < Latin insurgere to get up, ascend, rebel]

insurgent

Member of a political party who rebels against established leadership. See also antiterrorism; counterinsurgency; insurgency.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.insurgent - a person who takes part in an armed rebellion against the constituted authority (especially in the hope of improving conditions)insurgent - a person who takes part in an armed rebellion against the constituted authority (especially in the hope of improving conditions)
mutineer - someone who is openly rebellious and refuses to obey authorities (especially seamen or soldiers)
crusader, meliorist, reformer, reformist, social reformer - a disputant who advocates reform
revolutionary, revolutionist, subversive, subverter - a radical supporter of political or social revolution
Young Turk - a member of one or more of the insurgent groups in Turkey in the late 19th century who rebelled against the absolutism of Ottoman rule
2.insurgent - a member of an irregular armed force that fights a stronger force by sabotage and harassmentinsurgent - a member of an irregular armed force that fights a stronger force by sabotage and harassment
guerilla force, guerrilla force - an irregular armed force that fights by sabotage and harassment; often rural and organized in large groups
Maquis, Maquisard - a guerrilla fighter in the French underground in World War II
urban guerrilla - a guerrilla who fights only in cities and towns
warrior - someone engaged in or experienced in warfare
Adj.1.insurgent - in opposition to a civil authority or government
disloyal - deserting your allegiance or duty to leader or cause or principle; "disloyal aides revealed his indiscretions to the papers"

insurgent

noun
1. rebel, revolutionary, revolter, rioter, resister, mutineer, revolutionist, insurrectionist The insurgents took control of the main military air base.
adjective
1. rebellious, revolutionary, mutinous, revolting, riotous, seditious, disobedient, insubordinate, insurrectionary The insurgent leaders were publicly executed.

insurgent

adjective
Participating in open revolt against a government or ruling authority:
noun
Translations
rebelrebelantský
oprører
uppreisnar-uppreisnarmaîur
maištaujantissukilėlissukilęs
dumpīgsdumpinieksnemiernieks
rebelantský

insurgent

[ɪnˈsɜːdʒənt]
A. Ninsurgente mf, insurrecto/a m/f

insurgent

[ɪnˈsɜːrənt]
adjinsurgé(e)
ninsurgé(e) m/f

insurgent

nAufständische(r) mf

insurgent

[ɪnˈsɜːdʒənt]
1. adjribelle
2. ninsorto/a, rivoltoso/a

insurgent

(inˈsəːdʒənt) adjective
rising up in rebellion. an insurgent population.
noun
a rebel. the leading insurgents.
References in periodicals archive ?
'The activity aims to foster bilateral training and military diplomacy through the exchange of command experiences, knowledge, and strategies of both forces in defeating insurgencies in their respective countries,' the Philippine Army said.
The Philippines has one of the longest-running communist insurgencies in Asia.
His topics include cinema's encounter with colonial insurgencies, Italian neorealism and beyond,the mercenary subgenre and counter-insurgency, and Israel and reframing siege warfare into counter-terrorism.
Though developed decades ago, the determinants remain valid and applicable to similar insurgencies, such as the Boko Haram Insurgency.
(1) The first US "counterinsurgency era" began in the early 1960s when policymakers recognized the Soviet Union and China were inspiring or directly supporting left-leaning insurgencies to weaken the West, and to do so with less risk than direct military confrontation.
India is witnessing increased incidents of violence and killings related to communal violence, insurgencies and terrorism.
Only those states could do better in countering insurgencies that identified the difference between the core reasons and the add-on reasons that sustained insurgencies at the earliest.
Today's observers would have to be reminded that restive minorities once agitated for separation, and separatist insurgencies seemed to pose a serious challenge to India's survival.
The Rand Corporation has undertaken an extensive and detailed comparative examination of insurgencies begun and completed worldwide since the Second World War, focusing on the 71 most recently resolved conflicts in particular.
Separatist and Maoist insurgencies affect large swathes of India's northeast, northwest and central regions.
He said that the major difference between the newly developed POI and the previous one is that it focuses not just on the insurgencies themselves, but rather the conditions that allow insurgencies to operate in a given environment.
Given the impressive number of books on COIN, the abundance of new research on former guerrillas, military doctrine, lessons learned, and the experience of those who have led insurgencies (very few) and COINs (too many), do we better understand asymmetric warfare?