intangible

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in·tan·gi·ble

 (ĭn-tăn′jə-bəl)
adj.
1. Incapable of being perceived by the senses.
2. Incapable of being realized or defined.
3. Incorporeal.
n.
1. Something intangible: The athlete owed his success not only to strength and speed but also to intangibles such as perseverance and dedication.
2. often intangibles
a. An asset that cannot be perceived by the senses, such as intellectual property or goodwill.
b. Law Incorporeal property such as bank deposits, stocks, bonds, and promissory notes: a state tax on intangibles.

in·tan′gi·bil′i·ty, in·tan′gi·ble·ness n.
in·tan′gi·bly adv.

intangible

(ɪnˈtændʒɪbəl)
adj
1. incapable of being perceived by touch; impalpable
2. imprecise or unclear to the mind: intangible ideas.
3. (Accounting & Book-keeping) (of property or a business asset) saleable though not possessing intrinsic productive value
n
something that is intangible
inˌtangiˈbility, inˈtangibleness n
inˈtangibly adv

in•tan•gi•ble

(ɪnˈtæn dʒə bəl)

adj.
1. not tangible; impalpable.
2. not definite or clear to the mind; vague; elusive.
n.
3. something intangible, esp. an intangible asset, as goodwill.
[1630–40; < Medieval Latin]
in•tan`gi•bil′i•ty, in•tan′gi•ble•ness, n.
in•tan′gi•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intangible - assets that are saleable though not material or physical
assets - anything of material value or usefulness that is owned by a person or company
goodwill, good will - (accounting) an intangible asset valued according to the advantage or reputation a business has acquired (over and above its tangible assets)
Adj.1.intangible - (of especially business assets) not having physical substance or intrinsic productive value; "intangible assets such as good will"
business enterprise, commercial enterprise, business - the activity of providing goods and services involving financial and commercial and industrial aspects; "computers are now widely used in business"
tangible - (of especially business assets) having physical substance and intrinsic monetary value ; "tangible property like real estate"; "tangible assets such as machinery"
2.intangible - incapable of being perceived by the senses especially the sense of touch; "the intangible constituent of energy"- James Jeans
abstract - existing only in the mind; separated from embodiment; "abstract words like `truth' and `justice'"
tangible, touchable - perceptible by the senses especially the sense of touch; "skin with a tangible roughness"
3.intangible - hard to pin down or identify; "an intangible feeling of impending disaster"
unidentifiable - impossible to identify
4.intangible - lacking substance or reality; incapable of being touched or seen; "that intangible thing--the soul"
nonmaterial, immaterial - not consisting of matter; "immaterial apparitions"; "ghosts and other immaterial entities"

intangible

adjective abstract, vague, invisible, dim, elusive, shadowy, airy, unreal, indefinite, ethereal, evanescent, incorporeal, impalpable, unsubstantial the intangible dimensions of our existence

intangible

adjective
Translations

intangible

[ɪnˈtændʒəbl]
A. ADJ (gen) → intangible
B. CPD intangible assets NPLactivo msing intangible

intangible

[ɪnˈtændʒɪbəl]
adj
[quality, factor, aspect] → intangible
(FINANCE) [assets] → immatériel(le) intangibles
nplintangibles mpl

intangible

adj
fears, longingsunbestimmbar
(Jur, Comm) intangible propertyimmaterielle Güter pl; intangible capitalimmaterielles Kapital

intangible

[ɪnˈtændʒəbl] adj
a. (fears, hopes) → indefinibile
b. (Comm) (asset) → immateriale
References in periodicals archive ?
He also predicted that in future people would cognize the nature intangibly.
For an epistle dedicatory of the kind Ingenioso addresses to a patron in The First Part of the Return from Parnassus 1.1, an author might receive widely varying sums, or perhaps nothing; depending on their status, they might, more intangibly, be seeking the prestige or opportunities that association with a particular patron might give them.
Ownership of an icon as popular and prolific as Winnie-the-Pooh has been used to create and maintain local culture, that allows the citizens of the three communities to be intangibly united around a shared sense of identity.
More intangibly, not living alone is thought to be good for morale, and for neural stimulation.
Chinese consumers' focus on interpersonal relationships operates intangibly as a function of their consumption behavior, for example in the tendency to regard the brands that they use as being part of their social life and their relationships.
Its surroundings features a living culture transmitted to the visitor both, tangibly and intangibly. The many high-end lodging options make sure you do not astray from your comfort and well being, while on a crusade to immerse in Peruvian Culture.
The image of the bush as somehow playing into national identity --or, better still, as intangibly defining it--was distilled during this period.
More intangibly, reliance on copyright characterizes the harm as a
By extension, the element of sound suggests a unique existential conception and music offers a metaphor: all sound by nature exists intangibly and transiently--its performance is its very existence, its recital its reality.
The heart of the poem is the communion that unfolds as Yu-Pe-Ya plays the lute and Tse-Ky renders the words that the "wantoning notes intangibly obey" (l.
Since food is constructed, biologically, psychologically, and socially by the consumer (Fischler, 1988), data showed that consumers' valued the egg itself in two ways: tangibly with particular sensory and physical qualities, on the one hand, and intangibly, on the other.