integument

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Related to integumentum: keratin

in·teg·u·ment

 (ĭn-tĕg′yo͝o-mənt)
n.
1. A natural outer covering or coat, such as the skin of an animal or the membrane enclosing an organ.
2. Botany The outermost layer or layers of an ovule.

[Latin integumentum, from integere, to cover : in-, on; see in-2 + tegere, to cover; see (s)teg- in Indo-European roots.]

in·teg′u·men′ta·ry (-mĕn′tə-rē, -mĕn′trē) adj.

integument

(ɪnˈtɛɡjʊmənt)
n
1. (Botany) the protective layer around an ovule that becomes the seed coat
2. (Animals) the outer protective layer or covering of an animal, such as skin or a cuticle
[C17: from Latin integumentum, from tegere to cover]
inˌteguˈmental, inˌteguˈmentary adj

in•teg•u•ment

(ɪnˈtɛg yə mənt)

n.
1. a natural covering, as a skin, shell, or rind.
2. any covering, coating, or enclosure.
[1605–15; < Latin integumentum a covering, derivative of integere to cover, roof. See in-2, tegument]
in•teg`u•men′ta•ry (-ˈmɛn tə ri) adj.

in·teg·u·ment

(ĭn-tĕg′yo͝o-mənt)
A natural outer covering of an animal or a plant, such as skin, a seed coat, or a shell.

integument

skin
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.integument - an outer protective covering such as the skin of an animal or a cuticle or seed coat or rind or shell
covering, natural covering, cover - a natural object that covers or envelops; "under a covering of dust"; "the fox was flushed from its cover"

integument

noun
The tissue forming the external covering of the body:
Translations
Integument
integumenttiruumiinpeite

integument

[ɪnˈtegjʊmənt] N (frm) → integumento m

integument

nIntegument nt (spec)

integument

[ɪnˈtɛgjʊmənt] ntegumento
References in periodicals archive ?
37-38), arte de amar donde se compendia y renueva tanto la lirica amorosa trovadoresca como el roman de materia arturica bajo el integumentum de la poesia alegorica.
Muchas veces, bajo ese recurso de interpretacion que se llama integumentum o involucrum (51).
Among specific topics are the city and its schools, poetry and imitation, Platonic themes and variations, medicine and astrology, the purpose of natural science, the Trinity, the Incarnation, the function of integumentum, quotation and imitation, the standard and Laudian glosses, and Alan of Lille and Peter Lombard.
Thus, it elicits no great surprise when, in his preface to the first English translation of the Orlando Furioso (1591), Sir John Harington applies a variation of the integumentum theory to his general discourse on poetry and appends an allegorical gloss to each canto of his translation.