intemperate


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in·tem·per·ate

 (ĭn-tĕm′pər-ĭt, -prĭt)
adj.
1. Not temperate or moderate, especially in rhetoric or tone; unrestrained: an intemperate denunciation. See Synonyms at excessive.
2. Given to excessive drinking of alcoholic beverages.

in·tem′per·ate·ly adv.
in·tem′per·ate·ness n.

intemperate

(ɪnˈtɛmpərɪt; -prɪt)
adj
1. consuming alcoholic drink habitually or to excess
2. indulging bodily appetites to excess; immoderate
3. unrestrained: intemperate rage.
4. (Physical Geography) extreme or severe: an intemperate climate.
inˈtemperance, inˈtemperateness n
inˈtemperately adv

in•tem•per•ate

(ɪnˈtɛm pər ɪt, -prɪt)

adj.
1. given to or characterized by excessive or immoderate indulgence in alcoholic beverages.
2. immoderate in indulgence of appetite or passion.
3. showing lack of moderation or due restraint, as in action or speech; unrestrained; unbridled.
4. extreme in temperature, as climate.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin]
in•tem′per•ate•ly, adv.
in•tem′per•ate•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.intemperate - (of weather or climate) not mild; subject to extremes; "an intemperate climate"; "intemperate zones"
inclement - (of weather or climate) severe
temperate - (of weather or climate) free from extremes; mild; or characteristic of such weather or climate; "a temperate region"; "the temperate zones"; "temperate plants"
2.intemperate - excessive in behavior; "intemperate rage"
intense - possessing or displaying a distinctive feature to a heightened degree; "intense heat"; "intense anxiety"; "intense desire"; "intense emotion"; "the skunk's intense acrid odor"; "intense pain"; "enemy fire was intense"
immoderate - beyond reasonable limits; "immoderate laughter"; "immoderate spending"
temperate - not extreme in behavior; "temperate in his habits"; "a temperate response to an insult"; "temperate in his eating and drinking"
3.intemperate - given to excessive indulgence of bodily appetites especially for intoxicating liquors; "a hard drinker"
indulgent - characterized by or given to yielding to the wishes of someone ; "indulgent grandparents"

intemperate

Translations

intemperate

[ɪnˈtempərɪt] ADJ [person] (= immoderate) → desmedido, destemplado; (= drunken) → dado a la bebida, que bebe con exceso; [climate] → inclemente

intemperate

[ɪnˈtɛmpərət] adj
[language, remark] → exagéré(e)
The tone of the article is intemperate → Le ton de l'article est exagéré.
(old-fashioned) (drinking too much)intempérant(e)

intemperate

adj
person (= lacking moderation)unmäßig, maßlos; (= addicted to drink)trunksüchtig
climateextrem; windheftig; zeal, hasteübermäßig
language, commentausfallend, unbeherrscht

intemperate

[ɪnˈtɛmprɪt] (frm) adj (remarks, response, opinion) → privo/a di autocontrollo; (climate) → rigido/a; (habits) → smoderato/a; (person, lacking moderation) → intemperante; (drinking too much) → intemperante nel bere
References in classic literature ?
for he who is intemperate [1260a] and a coward will never do what he ought: it is evident then that both parties ought to be virtuous; but there is a difference between them, as there is between those who by nature command and who by nature obey, and this originates in the soul; for in this nature has planted the governing and submitting principle, the virtues of which we say are different, as are those of a rational and an irrational being.
The second will be espoused with caution by those who will seriously consider the difficulty of collecting men dispersed over the whole Union; the injury to the innocent, from the procrastinated determination of the charges which might be brought against them; the advantage to the guilty, from the opportunities which delay would afford to intrigue and corruption; and in some cases the detriment to the State, from the prolonged inaction of men whose firm and faithful execution of their duty might have exposed them to the persecution of an intemperate or designing majority in the House of Representatives.
To prevent therefore, for the future, such intemperate abuses of leisure, of letters, and of the liberty of the press, especially as the world seems at present to be more than usually threatened with them, I shall here venture to mention some qualifications, every one of which are in a pretty high degree necessary to this order of historians.
Then mad or intemperate pleasure must never be allowed to come near the lover and his beloved; neither of them can have any part in it if their love is of the right sort?
The necessity of a senate is not less indicated by the propensity of all single and numerous assemblies to yield to the impulse of sudden and violent passions, and to be seduced by factious leaders into intemperate and pernicious resolutions.
But, though luxurious, the Norman nobles were not generally speaking an intemperate race.
I suffered myself to use intemperate language to my wife.
As he said this, he glanced at Sir John, who lifted his hands and eyebrows, as if deploring the intemperate conduct of Mr Haredale, and smiled in admiration of the crowd and of their leader.
Le Quoi soon recovered his presence of mind and his decorum; and he briefly apologized to the ladies for one or two very intemperate expressions that had escaped him in a moment of extraordinary excitement, and, remounting his horse, he continued in the background during the remainder of the visit, the wit of Kirby putting a violent termination, at once, to all negotiations on the subject of trade.
I could not help reflecting bodingly upon the intemperate zeal with which middle-aged men are apt to surfeit themselves upon a seductive folly which they have tasted for the first time.
SOCRATES: And can either a young man or an elder one be good, if they are intemperate and unjust?
As a man Jonson, pugnacious, capricious, ill-mannered, sometimes surly, intemperate in drink and in other respects, is an object for only very qualified admiration; and as a writer he cannot properly be said to possess that indefinable thing, genius, which is essential to the truest greatness.