intendancy


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in·ten·dan·cy

 (ĭn-tĕn′dən-sē)
n. pl. in·ten·dan·cies
1. The position or function of an intendant.
2. Intendants considered as a group.
3. The district supervised by an intendant, as in Latin America.

intendancy

(ɪnˈtɛndənsɪ)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the position or work of an intendant
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) intendants collectively
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) history the district or area administered by an intendant
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
This intendancy should be eliminated and of course avoided in all circumstances.
contemporary research has made strategic game in the competition to impose another sentence:" Intendancy not must follow, but precede "(Charron and Separi, 2004, pg.
In short, situatedness gives individuality, relatedness communality and intendancy presencing.
The territory was to be administered directly under the auspices of the ministry of government as an intendancy.
The implementation of projects is under the supervision of residents in three forms: intendancy organized by the leading groups, intendancy organized by relevant departments, and individual residents.
These histories saw late Bourbon administrative reforms--the legalization of the reparto de mercancias, the increase in the alcabala tax, the establishment of tobacco and aguardiente monopolies, the arrival of visitador general Jose de Areche after 1777, and the intendancy system--as potential triggers that helped to explain a rise in social unrest during this time period.
But if this was not possible, <<I also have memories that in the partido of Chachapoyas, in the Intendancy of Trujillo, another mining source was discovered at the same time (as Huancavelica) with the same kind of cinabrio>> (17).